Author Topic: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju  (Read 25693 times)

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Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #50 on: 26-08-2016, 11:10:35 »

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #51 on: 01-09-2016, 08:19:51 »
Upotreba pametnih telefona smanjuje produktivnost?


Not using smartphones can improve productivity by 26%, says study

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Smartphones might be helping employees keep in touch with colleagues and do urgent tasks on the move, but using these devices at workplace actually make people less productive, says a new study by the Universities of Würzburg and Nottingham-Trent.
 
 The study, commissioned by Kaspersky Lab, showed that employees’ performance improved 26 per cent when their smartphones were taken away. The experiment tested the behaviour of 95 persons between 19 and 56 years of age in laboratories at the universities of Würzburg and Nottingham-Trent.   
 
 The experiment unearthed a correlation between productivity levels and the distance between participants and their smartphones.  “Instead of expecting permanent access to their smartphones, employee productivity might be boosted if they have dedicated ‘smartphone-free’ time. One way of doing this is to enforce rules such as no phones in the normal work environment,” says Altaf Halde, managing director - South Asia at Kaspersky Lab.
 
 Contrary to expectations, the absence of smartphones didn’t make participants nervous. Anxiety levels were consistent across all experiments. However, in general, women were more anxious than their male counterparts, leading researchers to conclude that anxiety levels at workplace are not affected by smartphones (or the absence of smartphones), but can be impacted by gender.
 
 “Previous studies have shown that separation from one’s smartphone has negative emotional effects such as increased anxiety, but studies have also demonstrated that one’s smartphone might act as a distractor. In other words, both the absence and presence of a smartphone could impair concentration,” said Jens Binder from the University of Nottingham-Trent.
 
 “Our findings from this study indicate that it is the absence, rather than the presence, of a smartphone that improves concentration,” says Astrid Carolus from the University of Würzburg.
 
 The results of the experiment correlate with the findings of an earlier survey named ‘Digital Amnesia at Work’. In this survey, Kaspersky Lab demonstrated that digital devices can have a negative impact on concentration levels. It showed, for example, that typing notes into digital devices during meetings lowers the level of understanding of what is actually happening in the meeting.                   

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #52 on: 02-09-2016, 07:50:06 »
Upotreba interneta povećava inteligenciju...



...ili ne.


So much for counter-phishing training: Half of people click anything sent to them

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Security experts often talk about the importance of educating people about the risks of "phishing" e-mails containing links to malicious websites. But sometimes, even awareness isn't enough. A study by researchers at a university in Germany found that about half of the subjects in a recent experiment clicked on links from strangers in e-mails and Facebook messages—even though most of them claimed to be aware of the risks.
The researchers at the Friedrich-Alexander University (FAU) of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, led by FAU Computer Science Department Chair Dr Zinaida Benenson, revealed the initial results of the study at this month's Black Hat security conference. Simulated "spear phishing" attacks were sent to 1,700 test subjects—university students—from fake accounts.
The e-mail and Facebook accounts were set up with the ten most common names in the age group of the targets. The Facebook profiles had varying levels of publicly accessible profile and timeline data—some with public photos and profile photos, and others with minimal data. The messages claimed the links were to photos taken at a New Year's Eve party held a week before the study. Two sets of messages were sent out: in the first, the targets were addressed by their first name; in the second, they were not addressed by name, but more general information about the event allegedly photographed was given. Links sent resolved to a webpage with the message "access denied," but the site logged the clicks by each student.
The messages that addressed the targets by name scored clicks from 56 percent of e-mail targets and 37 percent of Facebook message recipients. But while the less-targeted messages in the second test only yielded 20 percent results for the e-mails, they scored 42 percent via Facebook messages.
"The overall results surprised us, as 78 percent of participants stated in the questionnaire that they were aware of the risks of unknown links," Dr Benenson said in a FAU posting on the research. "And only 20 percent from the first study and 16 percent from the second study said that they had clicked on the link." But in fact, of those claiming they were security savvy, "we found that 45 and 25 percent respectively had clicked on the links," Dr Benenson said.
For those who admitted to clicking on the link, the majority said they did so out of curiosity. Half of those who didn't were warned off because they didn't recognize the sender's name, and a small minority avoided clicking because they were concerned about the privacy of the person who may have accidentally sent them the link. "I think that with careful planning and execution, anyone can be made to click on this type of link, even if it’s just out of curiosity," Benenson said.
Given the vast amount of personal data that's available to attackers—especially thanks to breaches like the one at the Office of Personnel Management, for example—crafting that sort of message for targets of interest has gotten a lot easier. The bottom line is that telling people not to click strange links is not going to be enough.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #53 on: 07-09-2016, 08:01:35 »
"Normalan" internet, dakle, onaj kojem pristupate iz browsera i koji se može indeksirati i pretraživati search enginima ustupa pred web appovima već godinama a sada već više od polovine vremena koje Amerikanci provedu na internetu bude provedeno tako. Slegnuti ramenima ili vikati na oblak? You decide!!!!!!!!!


Mobile apps are now bigger than the web — a trend that threatens to eat Google's core business



Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #54 on: 04-10-2016, 07:54:28 »
Has the US just given away the internet?



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A judge in Texas has put the kibosh on a last-minute legal attempt to block the controversial decision for the US to give up control of one of the key systems that powers the internet.
It's a move being breathlessly described by some as the US "giving up the internet" to the likes of China, Russia and the Middle East.
It’s the weekend, so if you’re keen to save yourself several hundred words and get on with whatever you like to do with your free time, then here we go: No, the US hasn’t given away the internet. Don’t be absurd.
The long answer, naturally, is more complicated than that - and one mired in mistrust of one of the internet’s key organisations, the detail of which I’ll dig into in a moment.
Let’s start with the basics.
For starters, while they can take the credit for inventing the underlying technology, the US never “had the internet” to begin with. Nobody did. It’s a, duh, network. Decentralised. That’s what makes it so powerful.
But there are bits of internet infrastructure that some people and governments do have control over, and that’s what this row is all about.


One of them is the DNS -  Domain Name System. This is the system for looking after web addresses. Thanks to the DNS, when you type bbc.com, you’re taken to the correct servers for the BBC website. It saves you the grief of having to remember a string of numbers.
That pairing of names and numbers is kept in one great big master file, the land registry of the web. The only organisation that can make changes is Icann, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers.
As of Saturday 1 October 2016, Icann will no longer be under US government oversight.
Instead, it’s now a fully “multi-stakeholder” non-profit that will take on board the views of companies, experts, academics and, yes, nation states, in how the naming system of the web is run.
Here’s a crucial bit: as a user of the internet, you won’t notice any difference whatsoever. And that’s because Icann isn’t a new entity. It’s been doing precisely this job since 1998 before the vast majority of us were even online.
The switch ends a transition that has essentially been in the works for around two decades, removing a dominant power the US had by circumstance rather than intention, and one which was causing friction in the international community.God of the internetBack when there were only a handful of websites, a man named Jon Postel - nicknamed “god of the internet” - was in control of DNS.
His task was assigning the easy-to-remember names to those bothersome numbers. It was a crucial step in accelerating the popularity of the world wide web.


When it became clear this was clearly not a job for one man, however godly, a new body was set up to take over the task. They called it the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, IANA.
In 1998, control of IANA was given to the newly-formed Icann. It was given the power over internet naming globally. Experts saw Icann as a good blend of interests and expertise. One which they felt would keep the internet as open and useful as possible.
One quirk of this set-up, though, was that all the while the US’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), part of the Department of Commerce, kept its final say over what the IANA did.
In short, if Icann did something the US government didn’t like, it could step in and knock it on the head.
With the handover, that power is lost -  though it was very sparingly used.FreedomsAs with most political tussles in the US, both sides say they are fighting for freedom.
Opponents of the plan, the likes of which include presidential candidate Donald Trump and his former rival Ted Cruz, say giving up the power amounts to handing it over to countries like China and Russia.
In one hearing, Senator Cruz asked if Icann - an international organisation - was bound by the First Amendment to the US constitution defending freedom of speech. No, came the reply from Icann's chief executive, Goran Marby.


Evidence enough, the senator argued, that by giving Icann complete control over the internet’s naming system, it could use that power to disrupt and censor communications online.
And so this week, at the eleventh hour, district attorneys representing four US states filed a legal challenge in Texas.
They had hoped to argue that the root file, the big directory of domain names and their associated servers, was US government property - and therefore required congressional approval before being "given away".
In court documents filed on Thursday, they also argued that without US control, well established domains like .gov and .mil (for government and military-related websites, respectively) could be tampered with.
In other words, a fully independent Icann could not be trusted and may act unpredictably once free of US oversight.
But others, including some of the web’s founding fathers, believe blocking the handover is a far bigger risk to the internet’s long term well-being.Diplomatic headacheBecause if the US didn’t handover its power to Icann, it may have been cornered into doing something far riskier.
Unnerved by US power, many countries, particularly Russia and China, have pushed for the DNS to be looked after by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), which is part of the UN.
This came to a vote in 2012, but failed. The US, UK, Canada and Australia were the dissenters, refusing to back a new treaty on the grounds it could be abused to affect internet governance, and by extension, content.



In other words, the four countries were worried by sharing out ownership of the internet’s core systems, more states could act like China and clamp down on internet use on their own countries - and all would be fair under the UN.
The US opposition drew heavy criticism - as it was essentially saying no countries can be trusted to look after the internet. Except the US. That didn’t go down well.
That said, given the US was responsible for creating the internet, it did have a valid argument in taking its time in handing over DNS. But it knew time was running out - ownership of the internet’s naming system was fast becoming a diplomatic headache the US needed to solve sooner rather than later.
The handover to Icann is a compromise that appears to suit the country very nicely, and not just because Icann will remain in Los Angeles.
It has the backing of many influential experts who, to counter the likes of Senator Cruz and Mr Trump, argue those opposed to it simply have no clue what they’re talking about.
On Friday, an amicus brief was filed to the Texas court by the Information Technology Industry Council (ITI), a group which represents the tech industry en masse. Its president, Dean Garfield, said: “This effort by a small number of attorneys general is misguided and inconsistent with the founding values of the Internet.
“It is an ironic endeavor because the transition will actually keep the internet an open and flourishing engine of innovation and open global communication.”
The judge agreed.
So when it comes to domain names, it's true. The US no longer has the keys to the kingdom.
But the important thing to remember is: neither does anyone else.

Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #55 on: 04-10-2016, 15:35:26 »
jel sad zavisimo od Vučića za torente?
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #56 on: 05-10-2016, 07:54:10 »
Vint Cerf: Modern Media Are Made for Forgetting



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Vint Cerf, the living legend largely responsible for the development of the Internet protocol suite, has some concerns about history. In his current column for the Communications of the ACM, Cerf worries about the decreasing longevity of our media, and, thus, about our ability as a civilization to self-document—to have a historical record that one day far in the future might be remarked upon and learned from. Magnetic films do not quite have the staying power as clay tablets.
It's more than a then-vs-now thing. It's a progression through history. Clay tablets are more resilient than papyrus manuscripts are more resilient than parchment are more resilient than printed photographs are more resilient than digital photographs.
At stake, according to Cerf, is "the possibility that the centuries well before ours will be better known than ours will be unless we are persistent about preserving digital content. The earlier media seem to have a kind of timeless longevity while modern media from the 1800s forward seem to have shrinking lifetimes. Just as the monks and Muslims of the Middle Ages preserved content by copying into new media, won't we need to do the same for our modern content?"
As media becomes more ephemeral across technological generations, the more it depends on the technological generation that comes next. As the paper texts of just a few decades ago fade and crumble, their only hope is digitization. The historical record depends on future technology—necessarily—which is a bit unsettling.
"It seems inescapable that our society will need to find its own formula for underwriting the cost of preserving knowledge in media that will have some permanence," Cerf concludes. "That many of the digital objects to be preserved will require executable software for their rendering is also inescapable. Unless we face this challenge in a direct way, the truly impressive knowledge we have collectively produced in the past 100 years or so may simply evaporate with time."
   

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #57 on: 06-10-2016, 09:15:29 »
4Chan ima problem sa parama, a može da se desi da ga kupi Martin Škreli. A meč mejd in hel!!!!!!

4chan is running out of money

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #58 on: 12-10-2016, 08:17:33 »
Milo bi, izgleda, da kupi 4Chan (tuđim parama, takođe):


Milo Yiannopoulos Eyeing Bid for 4chan Social Media Site

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4chan is an imageboard Internet site that allows users to post anonymously.  Milo Yiannopoulos, an alt-right hero known for his banishment from Twitter, is preparing a bid to acquire his own social media firm: 4chan.
Launched in 2003, 4chan is an imageboard Internet site that allows users to post anonymously. Its roots were in anime and manga, though it has evolved into much more and has facilitated some controversy, including allegations that it allows for cyberbullying.
The Hollywood Reporter has learned that Yiannopoulos, with the help of a wealthy backer, is preparing to approach 4chan owner Hiroyuki Nishimura, a Japanese entrepreneur, with a bid this week.
Contacted Saturday, Yiannopoulos confirmed plans for a possible acquisition but did not offer details.
"As a free-speech fundamentalist and a student of Internet culture, I appreciate how fragile and precious the 4chan ecosystem is and how much it gives to the wider Internet — even if some corners of it, such as /pol/, don't always approve of me very much," Yiannopoulos said.
/Pol/ is a reference to 4chan's political discussion board. It was created in 2011 to replace /new/, which was deleted after it became a haven for self-loathing, misogyny and racism.
"I spoke to my lawyer this morning about purchasing the business," said Yiannopoulos. "I intend to approach the current owners in the next few days with an offer. My philosophy as owner would be very simple: free-speech central, no ifs, no buts."
Yiannopoulos was banned from Twitter after he engaged in a war of tweets with Ghostbusters actress Leslie Jones.

Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #59 on: 18-10-2016, 13:52:40 »
The habit of multitasking could lower your score on an IQ test.

In other words, repetitively switching tasks lowers performance and productivity because your brain can only fully and efficiently focus on one thing at a time.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/devices-probably-ruining-productivity-heres/
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #60 on: 20-12-2016, 08:57:57 »
Upotreba interneta povećava inteligenciju, ali ne korisnika nego veštačke inteligencije koju slabo plaćeni ljudi širom sveta obučavaju. Clickwork? Ou jes:


Inside Amazon's clickworker platform: How half a million people are being paid pennies to train AI


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Internet platforms like Amazon Mechanical Turk let companies break jobs into smaller tasks and offer them to people across the globe. But, do they democratize work or exploit the disempowered?Each morning when she wakes up, Kristy Milland powers up her home computer in Toronto, logs into Amazon Mechanical Turk, and waits for her computer to ding.
Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT), which has been around for over a decade, is an online platform where people can perform small tasks for pay.
Milland is looking for job postings, or "HITs"—and the alerts tell her when a listing matches her criteria. "The alerts go off once a minute," Milland said. "I break from what I'm doing to see if it's a good HIT before I accept the job."
Sometimes, a group of HITs is posted. "If a batch comes up and it's lunchtime, or I have a doctor's appointment, or my dog needs to go out," said Milland, "I drop everything and do it. I'm literally chained to my computer. If this is how you feed your children, you don't leave."
She has been doing this for 11 years.
Milland is one of more than 500,000 "Turkers"—contract workers who perform small tasks on Amazon's digital platform, which they refer to as "mTurk." The number of active workers, who live across the globe, is estimated to run between 15,000 and 20,000 per month, according to Panos Ipeirotis, a computer scientist and professor at New York University's business school. Turkers work anywhere from a few minutes to 24 hours a day.


Who are Turkers? According to Ipeirotis, in October 2016, American Turkers are mostly women. In India, they're mostly men. Globally, they're most likely to have been born between 1980-1990. About 75% are Americans, roughly 15-20% are from India, and the remaining 10% are from other countries.
"Requesters"—the people, businesses, and organizations that outsource the work—set prices for each task, and the tasks vary widely. They include, but are not limited to:
  • data categorization
  • metadata tagging
  • character recognition
  • data entry
  • email harvesting
  • sentiment analysis
  • ad placement on videos
For instance, a recent task for Milland was to transcribe the contents of a receipt. According to Milland, the company that asks for that work will then sell the information to marketing and research departments at companies like Johnson & Johnson, P&G, and others. (The pay for that specific task was three cents.)The early days of AMTMilland calls herself a digital native. "I hit puberty, [and] I was on the internet," she said. And Milland said she's always "hustled online," using platforms like eBay for extra income. So when she came across an article about the opportunity to do click work when Amazon Mechanical Turk launched in 2005, it seemed like a perfect fit.



In those early days, Milland saw it as "more of an experiment" than real work, she said. But during the 2008-2009 recession, that changed. Milland, who had been running a daycare center, had to move—and lost her income. At the same time, her husband lost his job. She began working on AMT full-time. For Milland, that meant 17 hours a day, seven days a week.
"We started viewing it as work," she said. "And we really started questioning it as work."
Rochelle LaPlante, based in Los Angeles, has been working on AMT full-time since 2012. Echoing Milland, LaPlante agreed that the work is unpredictable. "You never know when work will be posted," she said. "It could be at 3 am. And there's absolutely nothing to do at 9 am."
"I'm not as hardcore as some people," LaPlante said, "because I do value my sleep." Others, she said, set alerts. "If a requester posts at 3 am, their computer will ding, their phone will ding, and they'll get out of bed to do that work. It completely controls their day." Neither Milland or LaPlante experience a "typical" day—primarily because they're usually setting a goal for how much money they need to make. During a normal day, LaPlante may work eight hours. "But it's 10 minutes here, 20 minutes there—it all runs together," she said.
So what do Turkers make, on average? It's hard to say. But Adrien Jabbour, in India, said "it's an achievement to make $700 in 2 months of work, working 4-5 hours every day." Milland reported that she recently made $25 for 8 hours of work, and called that "a good day." Just over half of Turkers earn below the US federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, according to a Pew Research Center study.
LaPlante talked about the difficult choices she needs to make, juggling work and life. "I have to decide: Do I take that job, or do I go to my family dinner?"
"For people living paycheck-to-paycheck on this kind of thing, on the edge of being evicted," she said, "those decisions are difficult."Master TurkersFor those working on AMT, there's a frustrating reality: Not all Turkers are created equal.
Amazon's system designates certain workers "Master's Level." When a new requester posts a HIT, it's automatically defaulted to find Turkers at this level—which costs more for the requester, and pays more for the worker.
If you don't have that designation, you are eligible for far fewer jobs.
One weekday in March, Milland said, there were 4911 available tasks on Mechanical Turk. She was eligible for 393 of them—just 8%.
So how does one attain a "Master's Level" designation? No one knows.
Milland has seen unqualified people—those with a low number of completed tasks, low approval ratings, false accounts, or suspensions—all earn a Master's Level.
"There does not seem to be any rhyme or reason," she said.
Amazon won't reveal their criteria to attain this level. (TechRepublic reached out to Amazon for comment, but after initially agreeing, the company later declined to be interviewed for this story.)
There are various theories floating around on Turker forums about how to get to Master's Level. Sometimes, a batch of HITs will be posted, and high-performers on that batch break into the Master's Level. "It's a matter of being in the right place at the right time," said Milland.
Beyond the Master's designation, where you live also disqualifies you for certain jobs. Being outside of the US is an obstacle, for instance, since many requesters restrict their tasks to US-only. Getting paid"No two Turkers are alike," said LaPlante. "Some come for essential income, and some people just use it for play money."
William Little is a moderator for TurkerNation, an online community for Turkers from Ontario, Canada. He uses AMT for extra cash. Little aims to make $15 a day for three hours of work. "Most of the time, I can achieve that," he said, "which is better than someone starting out." "No two Turkers are alike. Some come for essential income, and some people just use it for play money." Rochelle LaPlante, AMT worker in Los AngelesStill, the payment process is a major issue for many Turkers.
Right now, only Turkers in the US and India are paid in cash. All others, including Milland and Little in Canada, are paid via Amazon gift cards.
Little will drive 45 minutes to a US border store, where he can receive free shipping from Amazon, to pick up his packages. There are also workarounds for those who actually need the cash—although they mostly involve taking a loss on the earnings. Different websites, like purse.io, can convert the Amazon gift cards into bitcoins, for instance.
"You put your 'wish list' up on purse.io. I see that list and say 'I'll buy that for Hope.' I purchase that product and ship it to you," said Little. "The bitcoins are held in escrow. When you receive the product, I receive the bitcoins."
Then Little could sell the bitcoins, receive cash by PayPal, and transfer it to his bank. "I'm taking a loss on the transaction twice," he said. "It's not really worth it."
Another problem? Unpaid labor. A job might be rejected with no explanation. And beyond that, Turkers often spend time assessing whether a job is good. Searching, looking up the requestor. Loading scripts, adding tools, checking statistics.
Download this article as a PDF (free registration required).Slaves to the machineMiland and LaPlante are part of an invisible, online workforce—one that is increasingly in demand for their vital role in helping train intelligent machines.
Smart systems are gradually coming into everyday use, as artificial intelligence (AI) begins to be put to use across society. Today's narrow version of AI powers everything from voice-controlled virtual assistants, such as Amazon's Alexa and Microsoft's Cortana, to the computer vision systems that underpin the Autopilot in Tesla automobiles.
These systems are being taught to carry out tasks that historically would have been too complex for a computer, tasks that can range from understanding spoken commands to spotting a person crossing the road.
A common technique for teaching AI systems to perform these tricky tasks is by training them using a very large number of labeled examples. These machine learning systems are fed huge amounts of data, which has been annotated to highlight the features of interest. These examples might be photos labeled to indicate whether they contain a dog or written sentences that have footnotes to indicate whether the word "bass" relates to music or a fish.
This process of teaching a machine by example is called supervised learning and the role of labeling these examples is commonly carried out by Turkers and other online workers.
Training these systems typically requires vast amounts of data, with some systems needing to scour millions of examples to learn how to carry out a task effectively. Training datasets are huge and growing in size—Google's recently announced Open Images Dataset has about nine million images, while its labeled video repository YouTube-8M links to eight million labeled videos. ImageNet, one of the early databases of this kind, has more than 14 million categorized images. Compiled over two years, it was put together by nearly 50,000 people—most of whom were recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk—who checked, sorted and labeled almost one billion candidate pictures.
Because of the scale of these datasets, even when the labeling is spread across many workers, each individual can be repeating essentially the same simple action hundreds of times. It's menial and often mentally wearing work. Beyond labeling, Turkers and other online workers also clean up the often messy datasets ready for use in training machine learning systems—deduplicating, filling in gaps, and other tasks needed to sanitize the data.
As AI becomes ubiquitous, every big name firm in the tech industry is engaging people in this sort of microwork to support their machine learning efforts. Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, IBM and Microsoft—all of the major tech companies—either has their own internal crowdworking platform or contracts tasks to external alternatives, such as the two biggest, Amazon Mechanical Turk and CrowdFlower. "If anybody hears the 'ding' that indicates high-paying work, they say, 'Go, go, go!'" Kristy Milland, AMT worker in TorontoThese internal microwork platforms, such as Microsoft's Universal Human Relevance System (UHRS) or Google's EWOK, are used for a considerable amount of work. Around the time UHRS was launched, some five years ago, the platform was listed as being used within Bing and across various product teams in Microsoft and as orchestrating 7.5 million tasks per month.
According to Mary Gray, senior researcher at Microsoft, the firm's UHRS is "very similar" to Amazon Mechanical Turk. Gray said the firm uses UHRS to source labor in regions where "Amazon Mechanical Turk doesn't have the best reach" or where the work is sensitive and needs to be carried out in secret.
"Every company that has an interest in automating a service has access to or uses some sort of platform like Amazon Mechanical Turk. Indeed, many of them use Amazon Mechanical Turk," she said.
Chris Bishop, laboratory director for Microsoft Research Cambridge, said that UHRS gives Microsoft "a little bit more flexibility" over third-party platforms such as AMT, saying the firm is using AI to automatically identify strengths and weakness in crowdworkers, such as relative levels of expertise, which in turn helps Microsoft decide whether to attach more or less importance to different workers' results.
Beyond helping train AI, platforms like AMT are used by household names, everyone from eBay to Autodesk, to offload an assortment of repetitive, small-scale grunt work, which has made up the bulk of microtasks on AMT for many years.
This low-skilled, monotonous works spans many tasks: the occasionally traumatic process of screening user-generated images and other content, completing marketing and academic surveys, deduplicating entries and checking product descriptions and images for online retailers—Amazon created Mechanical Turk to help with its inventory management, categorizing images and products, writing website descriptions, extracting names from emails, translating text, transcribing text from speech or images, correcting spellings, verifying geolocations, giving feedback on web design, leaving reviews for products, choosing thumbnails for videos, or letting companies track which part of an ad you view.How did we get here?The idea of humans working to help machines carry out tasks they would otherwise find impossible is nothing new.
While the recent AI explosion has magnified demand for data labeling and curation, these sorts of microtasks date back more than two decades, said Gray, when work revolved around trying to improve spelling and grammar checking in word processors like Microsoft Word.
The wider history of click working and microtasks goes back to the rise of online retailers during the dotcom bubble of the late 1990s and early 2000s.
In 2001, Amazon, looking for new ways to more efficiently organize products on its rapidly growing store and solve difficult inventory problems that lay beyond the ability of computers, patented a hybrid machine/human system.
Four years later, Amazon realized its goal of building a digital platform to provide on-demand access to the huge pool of labor available online, with the launch of Amazon Mechanical Turk.



Being able to tap into Amazon's pool of "artificial artificial intelligence"—Amazon's description of Mechanical Turk's USP—appealed to a broad range of companies, everyone from online retailers to porn sites looking for affordable ways to sort their products, particularly at the low price for which Turkers would carry out microtasks.
In 2015, an average of 1,278 people or organizations were posting jobs to Amazon Mechanical Turk each day. While the amount of work being carried out by crowd laborers is increasing, particularly via sites like CrowdFlower, the exact amount remains unclear, since much work goes unrecorded or is contracted out multiple times.
And while more than 500,000 people may be signed up to work for Amazon Mechanical Turk, according to Amazon's website, these numbers don't reveal how people use crowd-working platforms—whether it's a full-time gig or something people do to earn cash on the side.
The Oxford Internet Institute estimated that the two large microtask platforms—Amazon Mechanical Turk and CrowdFlower—had a combined annual gross revenue of about $120 million in 2013. Professor Vili Lehdonvirta, associate professor and senior research fellow at the institute, estimates this is about 5% to 10% of the overall online crowd labor market, but again stresses the difficulty of sourcing accurate figures that account for employment via non-English language platforms globally.The other cost of click workBeyond the dull nature of click work for the people doing it, there can be more costly consequences. It can take a severe toll on the physical and mental health of some workers. 
"I would wake up, ignore everything else," said Milland. "My family would prepare food and leave it here for me so I could eat while I worked. I would eat at the computer and I wouldn't see my family. If my daughter needed homework help she'd have to go to her dad. It got so bad that I developed a ganglion cyst in my wrist. I've got a repetitive strain injury in my arm, but that's what you do."
"I was lucky that I was doing it at the peak when my husband was home, because he was unemployed," said Milland. "If anybody hears the 'ding' that indicates high-paying work, they say, 'Go, go, go!'"
A Turker from southern India, Manish Bhatia, has been a volunteer moderator for MTurk Forum for almost two years, and currently moderates two forums.
The strangest thing he'd been asked to do? Film himself lying in a bathtub with rose petals. "That was really weird," he said. In terms of the graphic content, Bhatia also reports seeing disturbing images. "You don't get to know beforehand," he said. "You can opt out afterwards." But, then you don't get paid for a job you don't complete and it wastes time.
Milland reported similar experiences. "People say to me 'Oh my god, you work at home? You're so lucky,'" said Milland. "You can't tell them 'I was tagging images today­­—it was all ISIS screen grabs. There was a basket full of heads.' That's what I saw just a few months ago. The guy on fire, I had to tag that video. It was like 10 cents a photo."
Milland isn't the only one tasked with tagging graphic or grotesque images.
"In the YouTube batch yesterday," said LaPlante in March, "there were a lot of beheadings. There's a check-box at the bottom that says 'Inappropriate Content,' and you push 'Submit," she said.
This kind of work can be important, since it has the potential to prevent objectionable material from appearing online. Still, it can be pretty traumatic to the people doing it, and the pay doesn't necessarily match the value it's providing to YouTube or its users.
Little said he would often have to tag photos or videos for pornographic content. "The only time I would take any exception to that is if there was child pornography," said Little. "Then I would report that to the requester and Amazon."
But in terms of gore or mutilation, for instance, it's "par for the course to see stuff like that," said Little.
Once a task is completed, it's impossible to know what happens with the result. "I wonder, is somebody going to review this? Hopefully, this is going to be reported or removed," LaPlante said. "Someone came across some child pornography, and they checked the box, but is that going to be ever checked into or looked into? You just don't know."
Since requesters use pseudonyms, no one knows who is asking for this work to be done. LaPlante calls it "the wild, wild west." And while requesters rate Turkers, there is no way for Turkers to rate or review requesters.
"You could be tagging faces in a crowd, but maybe something is being built for a malicious purpose or something," she said. "You don't know what you're doing, exactly, because there's no information."


"It's called vicarious traumatization," said John Suler, a psychology professor at Ryder University who specializes in behavior in cyberspace. "The same thing happens with first responders, and this is another example. When people see horrible images online, they become traumatized."
But we are not always aware of the psychological toll, he said. "Our conscious mind goes numb," said Suler. "But our unconscious mind doesn't—it picks up on things. We're underestimating how all these things we see online impact us at a subconscious level."
Workers have found online community forums to connect with each other and share stories, commiserate, and support each other. "There are so many questions around things like pay [and] content moderation," said Milland.
"It's a place to find social support," she said.
Each of the community platforms has a slightly different vibe. MTurk Forum has a "water cooler feel." On the other hand, Mturkgrind "seems to be more focused on production and efficiency and work," Milland said. At TurkerNation, she said, "the focus seems to be on answering questions and helping new users navigate and understand the system. They're a little more production-minded."
There's also a closed Facebook group called Mturk Members, with 4,436 members. The group uses the page to ask questions, post earnings, and cheer each other on.
LaPlante and three other women created MTurk Crowd, a worker forum for Turkers that helps them locate resources to enable them to do the best work they can on the platform. And there are many other forums, subReddits, and organizing platforms online, as well.
There's also an organizing site for workers: WeAreDynamo.org. It's where the "Dear Jeff Bezos" campaign was initiated. That campaign was an attempt to humanize Turkers, giving a voice to people actively engaged in the platform, where they stated their experiences and voiced concerns about the nature of their work.
Unfortunately, the campaign had very little impact: Although Indian workers were able to receive bank transfers after the campaign, neither Amazon nor Jeff Bezos ever directly addressed the initiative.
Communicating with Amazon is, for all practical purposes, virtually impossible. "The lack of support we have is disturbing," said Bhatia. "There's no live chat, no phone number." The only way a Turker can make contact is through email, which prompts a boilerplate response.
"I am utterly baffled by the choices they are making," said Little, "and the number one choice they are making a mistake in is a lack of communication. Why do they want to be so hands off? It can't because of the risk of a lawsuit, because their terms of service clearly state 'No class action lawsuits.'"
Little talked to lawyers, but "none of them would ever take on a single worker against Amazon," he said. And Amazon still refuses to talk. "Not even about rejections, not about improvements, not about how we think they could make more money," he said. "Nothing."
Lilly Irani, who teaches at UC San Diego, explores the "cultural politics of high-tech work practices.". Irani co-authored a 2013 study looking at forums for Turkers. The work aimed to understand how collective actions could work, looking at things like Dynamo, the collective platform for Turkers, and Turkopticon, which allows Turkers to review and rate available jobs. In a paper called "Turkopticon: Interrupting Worker Invisibility in Amazon Mechanical Turk," the authors stated: "We argued that AMT is predicated on infrastructuring and hiding human labor, rendering it a reliable computational resource for technologists."
Despite the poor working conditions, people like Milland rely on the income AMT provides. And she has a disability that makes her doubt her chances of being hired for a traditional job. "I applied at McDonald's, and they won't hire me," she said.
Download this article as a PDF (free registration required).Humans working alongside AIHelping fuel demand for this piecemeal, on-demand employment, predicts Microsoft's Gray, will be the growth of human/AI systems that promote a symbiotic relationship between people and machines.


She cites the emergence of virtual assistants such as Facebook M or customer service chatbots like IPsoft's Amelia, where humans either handle queries with the aid of AI or an AI handles queries and the human takes over when there is an issue the machine can't handle. Over time these smart systems can also learn from human responses, and gradually increase the breadth of queries they can tackle.
Services that use narrow AI to handle easier tasks and humans to handle the more complicated demands are on the rise. One of the major hubs for crowdsourced labor, CrowdFlower, recently launched a machine learning platform to automate certain tasks that previously would have been carried out by manual workers, leaving human workers to "focus on the harder cases and help the [machine learning] models learn". This approach results in significant amounts of manual work being automated, but the more optimistic forecasts predict that, while on a job-by-job level the human's share of the work is reduced, overall employment opportunities won't fall, due to increased demand for these joint AI-human services.How long will machines need people?But, for how long will humans have a role to play in training the smart systems of tomorrow?
As intelligent systems gain the ability to perform tasks that once had to be carried out by people, the nature of the work offloaded to humans on platforms like AMT changes.
In 2006, one year after AMT launched, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said a human was needed to spot whether a person was in a photo, a task that can now be carried out by deep learning, neural networks run by the likes of Baidu, Facebook, Google and Microsoft. So does this mean that the microtasks that offer employment today will gradually be taken over by machines?
The Oxford Internet Institute's Lehdonvirta sees little prospect of demand for AI-focused microtasks being sated. He forecasts that as machine learning is applied to more and more tasks, there will be an ever-increasing amount of data needing to be labeled. "We see this industry of work that's sourced, scheduled, managed, paid for, and shipped through an API."  Mary Gray, senior researcher at Microsoft"It's a moving target. There are so many applications that I don't think we'll be running out of that work anytime soon," he said.
Microsoft's Bishop said that in the near-future, AI systems will likely be trained using a mix of human-led, supervised learning and unsupervised learning. Microsoft's Gray believes there will be a long-lasting need for humans in the loop: "If anything, we would predict they're going to go up because the amount of things we're trying to automate is going up," she said."If we take those early cases of natural language processing and image recognition as a bellwether or as a benchmark, we see a pretty steady amount of work in the system."
The University of Southampton's Ramchurn uses the example of image recognition to illustrate just how much data will still need labeling.
"We are nowhere close to hitting a limit. Image labeling for example still relies on human labeling for every type of context in which pictures are taken," he said.
Such is the range of different settings in which images can be captured—in light, in shadow, obscured, unobscured—that "even after classifying 50 million pictures, only very few items in pictures will be accurately classified in all possible contexts," he said.
Expand that need for data to be labeled in a multitude of contexts to speech, natural language understanding, emotion recognition, and all of the many areas that machine learning is being applied, and there is no danger of the work drying up, he said. Especially as society finds new uses for machine learning.
"Demand is likely to keep growing and we will see more systems combining human and machine intelligence in novel ways to address real-world problems." Jobs as a serviceWhether or not people are needed to help train AI in the long run, the rise of platforms like Amazon Mechanical Turk reflects a wider, ongoing shift in working practices.
Just as the advent of faster global telecommunications links in the late 1990s made it possible to outsource and offshore a far greater range of business roles, so online crowd labor platforms and an abundance of people with access to broadband and a computer at home will again reshape the world of work, said Microsoft's Gray.
"We are able to, for better and for worse, break up jobs that use to be full-time occupations and turn them into work that can be done 24x7 by a range of people in different time zones, in different locations," she said.
"We've not so much dismantled or deskilled the work that we do, so much as we've created modules of it that different groups of people can pick up."
In the long run, Gray sees individuals chopping and changing between microtasks as being a much more common way of working. The practice of software managing the task of splitting jobs into chunks and then farming out the resulting microtasks to individuals via online platforms, as and when the need arises, is a natural progression from the outsourcing practiced by firms today, she said. "We have yet to grapple in any substantive way with how they completely reorient the vast majority of people on this planet to how they work." Mary Gray, senior researcher at Microsoft"Technologically, we are there and we have been there for the last decade in some areas of customer service," she said, citing the shifting of customer relations from call centers to live web chats and referencing a similar proportion of software-managed manual roles in retail, marketing and events industries.
As these online platforms become better at rapidly connecting employers with the skills they need for specific tasks, a key appeal of the practice for firms today, so the use of microwork will grow, she said.
"We see this industry of work that's sourced, scheduled, managed, paid for, and shipped through an API [Application Programming Interface]," said Gray. "It's exploding underneath our noses."
The Oxford Internet Institute's Lehdonvirta, shares Gray's perspective that it will become increasingly common for computer systems to orchestrate labor.
"Some of these same practices and ways of organizing the work, the computer mediation—the use of platforms to mediate the working relationship—those kind of things seem to be on the rise," said Lehdonvirta.
As online connectivity and crowd labor platforms continue to grow, enabling full-time jobs to be broken into smaller packets of contract work, it's time for governments to start paying attention to the human impact of this shift in the way we work, said Gray.
"We have yet to grapple in any substantive way with how they completely reorient the vast majority of people on this planet to how they work," she said.
"It's been going on for the last 30 years," Gray said. "We weren't paying attention because, frankly, it didn't hit the kinds of jobs that people in power have and their children have."


Scordisk

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #62 on: 04-03-2017, 13:01:09 »
Haha, nije losa ideja:)


Dybuk

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #64 on: 08-03-2017, 12:28:40 »
Pa da, to je taj paradoks. Usamljeni u (virtuelnoj) gomili.

Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #65 on: 08-03-2017, 13:57:18 »
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala


Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #67 on: 08-03-2017, 17:37:36 »
My ears!
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #68 on: 20-04-2017, 08:14:33 »
Stari tekst, ali vredan promišljanja:



Well-Kept Gardens Die By Pacifism

Quote
Good online communities die primarily by refusing to defend themselves.
Somewhere in the vastness of the Internet, it is happening even now.  It was once a well-kept garden of intelligent discussion, where knowledgeable and interested folk came, attracted by the high quality of speech they saw ongoing.  But into this garden comes a fool, and the level of discussion drops a little—or more than a little, if the fool is very prolific in their posting.  (It is worse if the fool is just articulate enough that the former inhabitants of the garden feel obliged to respond, and correct misapprehensions—for then the fool dominates conversations.)
So the garden is tainted now, and it is less fun to play in; the old inhabitants, already invested there, will stay, but they are that much less likely to attract new blood.  Or if there are new members, their quality also has gone down.
Then another fool joins, and the two fools begin talking to each other, and at that point some of the old members, those with the highest standards and the best opportunities elsewhere, leave...
I am old enough to remember the USENET that is forgotten, though I was very young.  Unlike the first Internet that died so long ago in the Eternal September, in these days there is always some way to delete unwanted content.  We can thank spam for that—so egregious that no one defends it, so prolific that no one can just ignore it, there must be a banhammer somewhere.
But when the fools begin their invasion, some communities think themselves too good to use their banhammer for—gasp!—censorship.
After all—anyone acculturated by academia knows that censorship is a very grave sin... in their walled gardens where it costs thousands and thousands of dollars to enter, and students fear their professors' grading, and heaven forbid the janitors should speak up in the middle of a colloquium.
It is easy to be naive about the evils of censorship when you already live in a carefully kept garden.  Just like it is easy to be naive about the universal virtue of unconditional nonviolent pacifism, when your country already has armed soldiers on the borders, and your city already has police.  It costs you nothing to be righteous, so long as the police stay on their jobs.
The thing about online communities, though, is that you can't rely on the police ignoring you and staying on the job; the community actually pays the price of its virtuousness.
In the beginning, while the community is still thriving, censorship seems like a terrible and unnecessary imposition.  Things are still going fine.  It's just one fool, and if we can't tolerate just one fool, well, we must not be very tolerant.  Perhaps the fool will give up and go away, without any need of censorship.  And if the whole community has become just that much less fun to be a part of... mere fun doesn't seem like a good justification for (gasp!) censorship, any more than disliking someone's looks seems like a good reason to punch them in the nose.
(But joining a community is a strictly voluntary process, and if prospective new members don't like your looks, they won't join in the first place.)
And after all—who will be the censor?  Who can possibly be trusted with such power?
Quite a lot of people, probably, in any well-kept garden.  But if the garden is even a little divided within itself —if there are factions—if there are people who hang out in the community despite not much trusting the moderator or whoever could potentially wield the banhammer—
(for such internal politics often seem like a matter of far greater import than mere invading barbarians)
—then trying to defend the community is typically depicted as a coup attempt.  Who is this one who dares appoint themselves as judge and executioner?  Do they think their ownership of the server means they own the people?  Own our community?  Do they think that control over the source code makes them a god?
I confess, for a while I didn't even understand why communities had such trouble defending themselves—I thought it was pure naivete.  It didn't occur to me that it was an egalitarian instinct to prevent chieftains from getting too much power.  "None of us are bigger than one another, all of us are men and can fight; I am going to get my arrows", was the saying in one hunter-gatherer tribe whose name I forget.  (Because among humans, unlike chimpanzees, weapons are an equalizer—the tribal chieftain seems to be an invention of agriculture, when people can't just walk away any more.)
Maybe it's because I grew up on the Internet in places where there was always a sysop, and so I take for granted that whoever runs the server has certain responsibilities.  Maybe I understand on a gut level that the opposite of censorship is not academia but 4chan (which probably still has mechanisms to prevent spam).  Maybe because I grew up in that wide open space where the freedom that mattered was the freedom to choose a well-kept garden that you liked and that liked you, as if you actually could find a country with good laws.  Maybe because I take it for granted that if you don't like the archwizard, the thing to do is walk away (this did happen to me once, and I did indeed just walk away).
And maybe because I, myself, have often been the one running the server.  But I am consistent, usually being first in line to support moderators—even when they're on the other side from me of the internal politics.  I know what happens when an online community starts questioning its moderators.  Any political enemy I have on a mailing list who's popular enough to be dangerous is probably not someone who would abuse that particular power of censorship, and when they put on their moderator's hat, I vocally support them—they need urging on, not restraining.  People who've grown up in academia simply don't realize how strong are the walls of exclusion that keep the trolls out of their lovely garden of "free speech".
Any community that really needs to question its moderators, that really seriously has abusive moderators, is probably not worth saving.  But this is more accused than realized, so far as I can see.
In any case the light didn't go on in my head about egalitarian instincts (instincts to prevent leaders from exercising power) killing online communities until just recently.  While reading a comment at Less Wrong, in fact, though I don't recall which one.
But I have seen it happen—over and over, with myself urging the moderators on and supporting them whether they were people I liked or not, and the moderators still not doing enough to prevent the slow decay.  Being too humble, doubting themselves an order of magnitude more than I would have doubted them.  It was a rationalist hangout, and the third besetting sin of rationalists is underconfidence.
This about the Internet:  Anyone can walk in.  And anyone can walk out.  And so an online community must stay fun to stay alive.  Waiting until the last resort of absolute, blatent, undeniable egregiousness—waiting as long as a police officer would wait to open fire—indulging your conscience and the virtues you learned in walled fortresses, waiting until you can be certain you are in the right, and fear no questioning looks—is waiting far too late.
I have seen rationalist communities die because they trusted their moderators too little.
But that was not a karma system, actually.
Here—you must trust yourselves.
A certain quote seems appropriate here:  "Don't believe in yourself!  Believe that I believe in you!"
Because I really do honestly think that if you want to downvote a comment that seems low-quality... and yet you hesitate, wondering if maybe you're downvoting just because you disagree with the conclusion or dislike the author... feeling nervous that someone watching you might accuse you of groupthink or echo-chamber-ism or (gasp!) censorship... then nine times of ten, I bet, nine times out of ten at least, it is a comment that really is low-quality.
You have the downvote.  Use it or USENET.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #69 on: 23-05-2017, 07:58:39 »
Vinton Cerf je čovek koji je "izmislio internet" (ovkao se ne piše Al Gore, reći će cinici), a Computer World ga intervjuiše povodom svoje pedesetogodišnjice:


http://computerworld.com/article/3193906/internet/cw-50-vint-cerf-on-his-love-affair-with-tech-and-what-s-coming-next.html

Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #70 on: 23-05-2017, 11:11:16 »
Koji moj su kvantni računari?
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala

mac

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #71 on: 23-05-2017, 12:25:50 »
Mnogi problemi se rešavaju tako što moraš brutalnom silom da pretražiš ceo domen mogućih rešenja da bi pronašao konkretno rešenje problema. Probaš svako potencijalno rešenje da bi jednom došao do pravog. E pa kvantni računar ti omogućuje da sva potencijalna rešenja ispitaš istovremeno. U svojoj srži kvantni računar ima generator slučajnih brojeva koji generiše sve slučajne brojeve istovremeno.

Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #72 on: 23-05-2017, 12:39:32 »
Ništa ne kontam... Što to ne bi mogo da radi i običan procesor?
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala

mac

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #73 on: 23-05-2017, 13:07:32 »
Običan procesor gleda sekvencijalno svako potencijalno rešenje. Neka mu za proveru jednog potencijalnog rešenja treba 0.1 ms, i neka je ukupan broj potencijalnih rešenja 3 milijardi (hehe), to znači da u najgorem slučaju kompjuteru treba 0.1 ms * 3000000000 = 300000 sekundi ili 3.5 dana. Kvantni kompjuter gleda sva potencijalna rešenja istovremeno, pa mu treba samo milisekunda da pronađe rešenje.


Da bi kvantni kompjuter mogao da pokrije ceo problemski domen (tri miljarde) mora da ima 32 "kubita" (jer je 2^32 taman veće od 3*10^9) koji rade u sadejstvu, i tu se sad gleda napredak tehnologije, u broju kubita koji mogu da istovremeno rade u sadejstvu.

Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #74 on: 23-05-2017, 13:38:59 »
Ok, nači brzina je u pitanju i ništa drugo?

More of the same, što se tiče performansa
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala

mac

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #75 on: 23-05-2017, 14:31:47 »
Asimetrična enkripcija (algoritmi RSA i eliptičke krive) su trenutno osnova svakog poslovanja na internetu. RSA algotiram je zastupljeniji. Jačina RSA algoritma se meri u veličini privatnog ključa, koja se meri u bitovima. Trenutno su aktuelni ključevi od 2048 bitova, i to trenutni konvencionalni računari ne mogu da razbiju ni za 100 godina. Ali kvantni kompjuter će teoretski da razbije te ključeve u sekundi. Šta da radimo, da povećamo ključ na 4096 bitova? To će bitno usporiti stvari na internetu, a kvantni kompjuter će to da razbije za dve sekunde. Znači RSA postaje beskoristan. Ceo internet postaje nebezbedan za korišćenje. SSL postaje beskoristan. Jeste samo brzina, ali brzina je drastična.

Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #76 on: 23-05-2017, 16:24:34 »
Ok, nisam mislio da je nebitno, nego da radi po istom principu, ne obrađuje podatke drugačije no brže.

I dalje su, kad se uprosti, u pitanju nule i jedinice koje se obrađuju matematički, nema nečeg što u stvari prevazilazi algoritam.

I dalje je to neki if-then programčić, logički nije napredovao od pukog niza komandi no je samo veoma umnožio komande?
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala

mac

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #77 on: 23-05-2017, 17:09:27 »
Kvantni kompjuter ima u sebi ono što nijedan kompjuter sada ne imade, tako da jeste suštinski nešto novo i različito. To suštinski novo i različito treba da nam posluži da brzo rešimo probleme koje smo i do sada rešavali, a za to treba nekakav ljudski napisan algoritam koji će da uposli ovo suštinski novo u kompjuteru. Taj algoritam je takođe nov, ali je bar nešto sa čime ljudi mogu da barataju.

Veća je razlika između kvantnog i klasičnog kompjutera, nego između kompjutera i abakusa.

Petronije

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #78 on: 31-12-2017, 09:08:40 »

Boban

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #79 on: 31-12-2017, 11:49:28 »
Ova teza možda nije bez osnova, mada ništa ne može da poveća inteligenciju nego se praksom, vežbom i tako tim stvarima može stvoriti iluzija veće pameti.
Evo kako ja to vidim, zapravo sam siguran da je tako jer sam se osvedočio u praksi.
Zamislite da je donji grafikon sastavljen od faza u nekom poslu. Potpuno glup čovek kada treba da savlada jednu situaciju kreće od podnožja i ide do vrha. Hiperinteligentan čovek je u stanju da obavlja stvari hodajući samo po vrhovima. Ostali su između, oni pametniji kada treba da pređu s jednog vrha na drugi ne moraju baš da siđu do podnožja, oni gluplji moraju.  To je esencija inteligencije, mogućnost baratanja različitim podacima i sklapanje svega toga u potrebnu sliku.
Zato glupi ljudi ne mogu da budu pisci.
Kompjuter, sam po sebi je otelotvorenje rešavanja situacija odozgo, uz minimalno spuštanje nadole, doslovno skaknje po vrhovima ovog grafikona. Internet sa svojim hiperlinkovima i umreženošću svega sa svim ne opamećuje ljude, ali ih tera da izvuku iz sebe maksimum kombinatorike i onda to sve može da liči da su postali pametniji.

Put ćemo naći ili ćemo ga napraviti.

mac

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #80 on: 31-12-2017, 12:14:47 »
Kakve veze ima prodaja električnih vozila u Kanadi sa inteligencijom na internetu?

scallop

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #81 on: 31-12-2017, 12:18:35 »
Internet ne uvećava inteligenciju, ali ohrabruje osrednje.


Umesto glupih i nerazumljivih grafikona, evo jedne zanimljive timeline.


Šapirograf - fotokopiranje - letraset slova - budženje fontova - chiwriteri i ostala pakovanja - kolor izdanja...


Jesmo li na tom putu postali inteligentniji ili smo postali brži i vizuelno prihvatljiviji?
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.

Boban

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #82 on: 31-12-2017, 13:04:25 »
hm... nisam verovao da će doći dan na forumu ZS da jedna metafora bude izvrguta ruglu jer nije direkno opisana.
Put ćemo naći ili ćemo ga napraviti.

scallop

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #83 on: 31-12-2017, 13:17:54 »
hm... nisam verovao da će doći dan na forumu ZS da jedna metafora bude izvrguta ruglu jer nije direkno opisana.


Nadam se da to ima veze sa Macom, a ne sa mnom. :shock:
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.

mac

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #84 on: 31-12-2017, 17:00:42 »
Ma ja samo hoću da svi znaju kako sam pronašao grafik na internetu. Jer sam pametan.



Black swan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #87 on: 15-01-2018, 07:26:37 »
bolje stari baba koja rovi po kanti
od njega
Najjači forum na kojem se osjećam kao kod kuće i gdje uvijek mogu reći što mislim bez posljedica, mada ipak ne bih trebao mnogo pričati...

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #88 on: 25-01-2018, 11:19:38 »
Sećate se plešuće bebe? Prvog znaka da će eksperiment koji zovemo Internet krenuti najgorim tajmlajnom u budućnost? Pa, evo šta čovek zaslužan za njenu popularnost ima da kaže:

I Have a Confession to Make

Meho Krljic

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #89 on: 25-02-2018, 07:17:01 »
Naravno, bilo je samo pitanje "kada" a ne i "da li" će blokčejn biti predložen kao alatka za oblikovanje političkih odluka.
 
 
 Liquid democracy uses blockchain to fix politics, and now you can vote for it


Ugly MF

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #91 on: 13-03-2018, 23:45:34 »
E, narode, imal' ko iskustva sa onim VIP G4 internetom.
Ja sam na telekomovoj telefonsko-fixnoj zici,
a cujem da je taj G4 kao bolji?!
Dok sam ovo iskuckao, cujem i telekom ima tu G4 mrezu?!

Koristi li iko to valja li?

scallop

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #92 on: 13-03-2018, 23:55:40 »
Garant ne povećava inteligenciju.
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.

Ugly MF

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #93 on: 13-03-2018, 23:58:32 »
Sta ce mi to?
Da brze skapiram u kakvom sam cabru?
Ti ne nauci dosad da je blazenstvo u neznanju!?!?

scallop

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #94 on: 14-03-2018, 00:05:01 »
Kako da naučim kad nemam mobilni telefon?
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.

Petronije

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #95 on: 14-03-2018, 00:44:43 »
E, narode, imal' ko iskustva sa onim VIP G4 internetom.
Ja sam na telekomovoj telefonsko-fixnoj zici,
a cujem da je taj G4 kao bolji?!
Dok sam ovo iskuckao, cujem i telekom ima tu G4 mrezu?!

Koristi li iko to valja li?
Ti verovatno misliš na ove nove internet pakete koje mobilni operateri nude preko svojih mreža? I verovatno misliš na 4g a ne g4? Ako je tako, treba da znaš par stvari. Obično je mesečni limit oko 100gb, što je uglavnom dovoljno za prosečnog korisnika. Ako ti ukućani dosta troše interneta, ako se puno downloaduje, gleda youtube u visokim kvalitetu itd. može biti tesno. Drugo, treba proveriti da li imaš u kući uopšte 4g mrežu, i čija je. To se lako proveri, svaki noviji telefon sad podržava 4g, instalira se aplikacija speedtest i pustiš da ti istestira brzinu. Ako imaš 4g i ako je dobar signal, sigurno će biti veća brzina nego na telekomovom raspalom 10mbit adslu. Uzmi u obzir da i telenor nudi 4g kućni net, mislim da su cene oko 1000 uz ugovor na dve godine, dobija se i ruter naravno. Tako da, ako ne hvataš vip, probaš telenor ili telekom, neki ćeš sigurno uhvatiti, a ako živiš u gradu, verovatno dva, ako ne i sva tri.

Sent from my Le X626 using Tapatalk


Labudan

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #96 on: 14-03-2018, 01:12:36 »
Agli, kako bre bez kabla, pa nije Zemlja okrugla!
šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala

Ugly MF

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Re: Upotreba Interneta povećava inteligenciju
« Reply #97 on: 14-03-2018, 08:37:35 »
Okrugla kao Zemljin krug ,jeste, ravna kao gramofonska ploca, ali sa cvrstom kupolom iznad od koje se nazad odbijaju svi radio-talasi, te je tako komunikacija prosta.


Labudan

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šta će mi bogatstvo i svecka slava sva kada mora umreti lepa Nirdala