Author Topic: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!  (Read 4212 times)

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Ygg

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Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« on: 21-10-2010, 23:36:47 »
Traži se volonter za put na Mars u jednom smjeru

Profesori s washingtonskog sveučilišta pozivaju sve zainteresirane da se jave za put na Mars u jednom smjeru.

Dirk Shulze Makuch i fizičar Paul Davies ističu da bi im najviše novca potrošilo vraćanje volontera natrag na zemlju pa bi na taj način dosta uštedili i kako kažu, 'započeli dugotrajnu kolonizaciju planeta'. 'Mi predviđamo da će se uskoro započeti s eksploatacijom Marsa i za početak poslali bi samo jednu osobu za kojom bi poslije krenule ekspedicije s četiri osobe na dvije letjelice', otkrivaju dvojica profesora te naglašavaju da njihova zamisao ne predviđa ostavljanje čovjeka na Marsu već žele cijelu seriju misija koje će vremenom osigurati dugotrajnu kolonizaciju planeta.

Pravi primjer, po njima, su istraživači poput Columba, Frobishera i Amundsena koji u svojim istraživanjima nisu planirali ostati na otkrivenim destinacijama, no snosili su rizik da bi pri tome mogli vrlo vjerojatno i poginuti.

'Za početak volonter će najvjerojatnije morati živjeti u špilji. Sa Zemlje bi mu redovito dostavljali zalihe, no malo pomalo bi počeli iskorištavati vodu i minerale s Marsa te bi s vremenom postali samodostatni', objašnjavaju dvojica znanstvenika. također, očekuju veliki broj prijava iz 'znanstvenih ili avanturističkih pobuda'.

Shulze Makuch naglašava kako bi krenuo i sam, ali tek kad mu djeca odrastu.


http://dnevnik.hr/vijesti/znanost-it/trazi-se-volonter-za-put-na-mars-u-jednom-smjeru.html
"I am the end of Chaos, and of Order, depending upon how you view me. I mark a division. Beyond me other rules apply."

Brock Landers

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #1 on: 21-10-2010, 23:37:47 »
Odoh ja!

mac

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #2 on: 22-10-2010, 00:14:30 »
Kolumbo, Frobisher i Amundsen nisu imali robote. Jeftinije je poslati robote nego jednog čoveka, makar i u jednom smeru.

Lord Kufer

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #3 on: 22-10-2010, 01:57:46 »
Volonter = Idijot

scallop

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #4 on: 22-10-2010, 08:11:25 »
To je neko psihijatrijsko istraživanje. Broje idiote.
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.

mac

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #5 on: 22-10-2010, 10:48:02 »
Evo ga originalni članak: http://journalofcosmology.com/Mars108.html

U članku se samo teoretiše o kolonizaciji, nema nikakavog pozivanja dobrovoljaca. Istovremeno, lepo piše da bi najpre roboti uspostavili kamp, pa bi tek onda došli kolonizatori. Znači opet su novinari pogrešno preneli.

Lord Kufer

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #6 on: 22-10-2010, 12:20:40 »
Zbog ovoga je i propala naučna fantastika. Jer su idioti stvarno pomislili... :)

-_-

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #7 on: 11-01-2013, 02:29:49 »
Quote
San će biti jedan od najvećih izazova koji će se naći pred astronautima
u budućim misijama koje će za cilj imati slanje čoveka na Mars.

Najveći problem odlaska na Mars je - san?

-_-

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Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #9 on: 28-11-2013, 13:09:36 »
Nije Mars, al da ne otvaram novu temu: noćas kometa:

See Comet ISON Slingshot Around Sun: Live SOHO Spacecraft Views




tomat

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #10 on: 29-11-2013, 00:18:10 »
ako sam dobro razumeo, kometa nije preživela susret sa Suncem :(
Arguing on the internet is like running in the Special Olympics: even if you win, you're still retarded.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #11 on: 29-11-2013, 08:05:16 »
Nije se ni mnogo očekivalo da preživi, al evo šta kažu najnovije vesti:
 Comet ISON is down, but not out!
Quote

NOVEMBER 28, 2013.  It has been … a ride.  Comet ISON rounded the sun today at 18:45 UTC/ 1:45 p.m. ES, and appeared to be disintegrating.  Now this evening the comet is appearing brighter again.  Will some remnant be visible from Earth in early December, as ISON pulls away from the solar glare?  It hardly seems likely at this point that we’ll get a very bright comet.  But we might get something.  And, whatever happens now, hasn’t it been great so far?
 
By Thursday evening, at least one scientist – Karl Battams at NASA’s Comet ISON Observing Campaign – wrote on Twitter:
 
Alright we’re calling it, and you heard it here first: We believe some small part of #ISON’s nucleus has SURVIVED perihelion.

The bad news about ISON came earlier today.  Karl Battams – who has almost singlehandedly informed the world about this comet – wrote shortly before perihelion:
 
Last night
[Nov. 27], I was optimistic that comet ISON would continue its dramatic brightening trend, and soar into the negative magnitudes. This morning it is indeed with a heavy heart that I show you the image [above], in which we clearly see that ISON has faded rather dramatically in the past few hours. It is still likely around -1 magnitude, but this number is falling fast.
… and now I’m reluctantly thinking it seems very unlikely to survive at this point. I do think it will reach perihelion, and reach the NASA SDO field of view, but based on what I see it doing right now, I will be very surprised to see something of any consequence come out the other side.
BUT… at every single opportunity it can find, Comet ISON has done completely the opposite of what we expect, and it certainly wouldn’t be out of character for this dynamic object to again do something remarkable.
Bottom line: Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)’s perihelion – closest point to the sun – is November 28, 2013.  Perihelion was around 18:45 UTC/ 1:45 p.m. EST on November 28.  It doesn’t appear that the comet has survived, but it is showing some signs of life.

Na linku imaju i slike.


Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #13 on: 07-07-2016, 07:52:50 »
Juno je u orbiti Jupitera već par dana. Očekujemo ozbiljne fotografije any time now  :lol:


'Welcome to Jupiter!' NASA's Juno space probe arrives at giant planet


Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #14 on: 31-08-2016, 07:52:17 »
Nasa ends year-long Mars simulation on Hawaii



Quote
A team of six people have completed a Mars simulation in Hawaii, where they lived in near isolation for a year.
Since 29 August 2015, the group lived in close quarters in a dome, without fresh air, fresh food or privacy.
Experts estimate that a human mission to the Red Planet could take between one and three years.
The Nasa-funded study run by the University of Hawaii is the longest of its kind since a Russian mission that lasted 520 days
Having survived their year in isolation, the crew members said they were confident a mission to Mars could succeed.
"I can give you my personal impression which is that a mission to Mars in the close future is realistic," Cyprien Verseux, a crew member from France, told journalists.  "I think the technological and psychological obstacles can be overcome."


But mission commander Carmel Johnston said the lack of privacy over the past year had been difficult.
"It is kind of like having roommates that just are always there and you can never escape them so I'm sure some people can imagine what that is like and if you can't then just imagine never being able to get away from anybody," she said.
Tristan Bassingthwaighte, a doctor of architecture at the University of Hawaii, praised research done into the human element of space travel.
"The research going on up here is just super vital when it comes to picking crews, figuring out how people are going to actually work on different kinds of missions, and sort of the human factors element of space travel, colonisation, whatever it is you are actually looking at," he said.
The team consisted of a  French astro-biologist, a German physicist and four Americans - a pilot, an architect, a journalist and a soil scientist.
The experiment dealt with the human element of exploration.
Whilst conducting research, the six had to live with limited resources, wear a space-suit when outside the dome, and work to avoid personal conflicts.


They each had a small sleeping cot and a desk inside their rooms. Provisions included powdered cheese and canned tuna.
Missions to the International Space Station normally only last six months.




Ima i slika na linku.

Pizzobatto

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #15 on: 31-08-2016, 09:23:33 »
Кад је Поли Шор мого диздржи могу и астронаути!
Better a witty fool than a foolish wit


Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #17 on: 07-09-2016, 08:11:10 »
Pronađen modul poslat na kometu za koga se mislilo da je izgubljen  :-| :-| :-| :-| :-|


Philae Found! Rosetta Spies Dead Comet Lander

Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #18 on: 25-09-2016, 05:51:25 »
Na brzinu, dok Tramp ne uleti u ovalni, jelte, kabinet:
 
 
  Senate panel authorizes money for Mars mission, shuttle replacement 
 
Quote

WASHINGTON — With a new president on the horizon, a key Senate committee moved Wednesday to protect long-standing priorities of the nation’s space program from the potential upheaval of an incoming administration.
Members of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee passed a bipartisan bill authorizing $19.5 billion to continue work on a Mars mission and efforts to send astronauts on private rockets to the International Space Station from U.S. soil — regardless of shifting political winds.
Lawmakers haven't forgotten that President Obama, shortly after taking office, scrapped the Bush administration’s Constellation program that sought to send astronauts back to the moon. Many members of Congress felt stung by the cancellation and angry that Obama hadn't consulted them.
“We have seen in the past the importance of stability and predictability in NASA and space exploration, (and) that whenever one has a change in administration, we have seen the chaos that can be caused by the cancellation of major programs,” said Sen. Ted Cruz, the Texas Republican who chairs the subcommittee overseeing the space program. “The impact in terms of jobs lost, the impact in terms of money wasted has been significant.”
The $19.5 billion authorized for fiscal 2017 under the NASA Transition Authorization Act of 2016 is the same amount approved by House appropriators and slightly more than the $19.3 billion approved by members of the Senate Appropriations Committee. It's not clear when the Senate bill will reach the floor, where it's expected to pass.
 


Ugly MF

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #20 on: 30-09-2016, 08:26:53 »
Much higher 'tower of Babylon' these days.....

Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #21 on: 02-11-2016, 09:13:14 »
I Jeff Bezos, gazda Amazona, provodi vreme zagledan u nebo:


Where does Jeff Bezos foresee putting space colonists? Inside O’Neill cylinders


Quote
SpaceX’s Elon Musk wants to settle humans on Mars. Others talk about a Moon Village. But Seattle billionaire Jeff Bezos has a different kind of off-Earth home in mind when he talks about having millions of people living and working in space.
His long-range vision focuses on a decades-old concept for huge artificial habitats that are best known today as O’Neill cylinders.
The concept was laid out in 1976 in a classic book by physicist Gerard O’Neill, titled “The High Frontier.” The idea is to create cylinder-shaped structures in outer space, and give them enough of a spin that residents on the inner surface of the cylinder could live their lives in Earth-style gravity. The habitat’s interior would be illuminated either by reflected sunlight or sunlike artificial light.
O’Neill cylinders and their ilk have become a standby for hard science-fiction stories. For example, in Kim Stanley Robinson’s “2312,” hollowed-out asteroids known as “terraria” house communities that travel back and forth between planets. In the movie “Interstellar,” Matthew McConaghey’s character finds himself inside an O’Neill-type outpost named Cooper Station near Saturn.


Bezos is said to have talked up the concept in the 1980s, when he was a starry-eyed student at Princeton. Three decades later, he’s the CEO of Amazon with a net worth estimated at $67 billion, and with his own space venture called Blue Origin.
So far, Blue Origin has launched a reusable rocket ship called New Shepard on uncrewed suborbital test flights. But Bezos has much bigger ambitions, for an orbital launch system called New Glenn and a super-rocket called New Armstrong.
During last weekend’s Pathfinder Awards banquet at Seattle’s Museum of Flight, Bezos referred to his long-term goal of having millions of people living and working in space, as well as his enabling goal of creating the “heavy lifting infrastructure” to make that happen.
In Bezos’ view, dramatically reducing the cost of access to space is a key step toward those goals.
“Then we get to see Gerard O’Neill’s ideas start to come to life, and many of the other ideas from science fiction,” Bezos said. “The dreamers come first. It’s always the science-fiction guys: They think of everything first, and then the builders come along and they make it happen. But it takes time.”


For Musk, the prime driver behind settling people on Mars is to provide a backup plan for humanity in the event of a planetwide catastrophe – an asteroid strike, for example, or environmental ruin, or a species-killing pandemic. Bezos sees a different imperative at work: humanity’s growing need for energy.
“We need to go into space if we want to continue growing civilization,” he explained. “If you take baseline energy usage on Earth and compound it at just 3 percent per year for less than 500 years, you have to cover the entire surface of the Earth in solar cells. That’s just not going to happen.”
Some might say the limits to growth will force civilization into a static condition, but Bezos sees space industry as the frontier for continued growth.
“I predict that in the next few hundred years, all heavy industry will move off planet. It will be just way more convenient to do it in space, where you have better access to resources, better access to 24/7 solar power,” he said last weekend. “Solar power on Earth is not that great, because the planet shades us half the time. In space, you get solar power all the time. So there’ll be a lot of advantages to doing heavy manufacturing there, and Earth will end up zoned residential and light industry.”
The way Bezos sees it, in-space power generation and manufacturing is the answer, rather than sending a million people to Mars.
“We want to go to space to save the Earth,” Bezos said. “I don’t like the ‘Plan B’ idea that we want to go to space so we have a backup planet. … We have sent probes to every planet in this solar system, and believe me, this is the best planet. There is no doubt. This is the one that you want to protect.”
Hundreds of years from now, will Bezos’ strategy win out, or will Musk’s? Both, or neither? It may seem airy-fairy to even consider the question – until you realize that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent right now to turn those science-fiction visions into realities.



Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #22 on: 07-02-2017, 06:27:15 »
The Mars rover just sent back data that has scientists completely stumped
 
Quote

The Curiosity rover has been cruising around on Mars since late 2012, so you’d think that scientists would have a pretty good handle on the kind of data it’s been sending back by now. However, some of the latest readings the rover has taken are totally contradicting many of the theories scientists have about Mars, and most notably when and how liquid water existed on its surface.
 
We — and by “we” I mean scientists that are way more intelligent than you or I — know few concrete things about Mars’ past, but one thing we’re sure of is that liquid water once existed on its surface. There’s been ample evidence to suggest it, and at this point it’s something most scientists assume as fact.
However, in order for liquid water to have existed on the surface of the red planet billions of years ago the conditions would have to have been warm enough, and the models that climate researchers rely on suggest it simply wouldn’t have been. So, a theory arose that perhaps Mars’ atmosphere was so thick with carbon dioxide that the planet was able to remain warm enough to support liquid water, thanks to a greenhouse effect. So with that theory in flux, the Curiosity rover set out to confirm it by sampling bedrock from an ancient lake, assuming it would find ample carbonate materials, thereby supporting the greenhouse warming theory. Well, it didn’t.
“We’ve been particularly struck with the absence of carbonate minerals in sedimentary rock the rover has examined,” NASA’s Thomas Bristow explains. “It would be really hard to get liquid water even if there were a hundred times more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than what the mineral evidence in the rock tells us.”
In short, Mars researchers just had their best and brightest theory about how liquid water existed on the planet’s surface shot in the foot. Water was there, but how and why are now an even bigger puzzle, and the ever useful Curiosity rover just gave us yet another thing to scratch our collective heads about.
 

mac

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #23 on: 07-02-2017, 11:12:37 »
Možda je Mars bio bliže Suncu ranije.


Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #25 on: 05-03-2017, 08:29:43 »
Džef Bezos ne dopušta da Maskovi planovi za turističke letove na mesec prođu bez adekvatne reakcije:
 
 Jeff Bezos and Blue Origin propose ‘Amazon-like’ delivery to the moon in 2020
 
Ovo me užasno podseća na rivalstvo između Uncle Scroogea i Rockerducka  :lol:
 
 

Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #26 on: 20-03-2017, 09:06:02 »
These Scientists Sent a Rocket to Mars for Less Than It Cost to Make “The Martian”

Indija, naravno. Plus, tim sastavljen od žena. Fak jea!!!!!!!!!!!

Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #27 on: 02-04-2017, 06:50:50 »
SpaceX makes aerospace history with successful launch and landing of a used rocket
 
Quote

After more than two years of landing its rockets after launch, SpaceX finally sent one of its used Falcon 9s back into space. The rocket took off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, this evening, sending a communications satellite into orbit, and then landed on one of SpaceX’s drone ships floating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was round two for this particular rocket, which already launched and landed during a mission in April of last year. But the Falcon 9’s relaunch marks the first time an orbital rocket has launched to space for a second time.
 
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk appeared on the company’s live stream shortly after the landing and spoke about the accomplishment. “It means you can fly and refly an orbital class booster, which is the most expensive part of the rocket. This is going to be, ultimately, a huge revolution in spaceflight,” he said.
 
This evening’s mission was a critical milestone for SpaceX, which has been working to make its rockets partially reusable since as early as 2011. Up until now, practically all orbital rockets have been expendable, so they’re basically thrown away once they launch into space. That means an entirely new rocket — which can cost tens to hundreds of millions of dollars to make — has to be built for each mission to orbit. SpaceX’s strategy has been to land its rockets after launch in an effort to fly them again and again. That way the company can partially save on manufacturing costs for each mission.
SpaceX doesn’t save the entire Falcon 9 rocket after each launch though. It saves the first stage — the 14-story core of the Falcon 9 that contains the main engines and most of the fuel needed for launch. About a few minutes after takeoff, the first stage separates from the top of the rocket and makes a controlled descent back to Earth — either landing on solid ground or on one of the company’s autonomous drone ships in the ocean. Prior to tonight’s launch, SpaceX had attempted 13 of these rocket landings and eight vehicles had successfully stuck the touchdown. But as SpaceX slowly acquired a growing stockpile of recovered rockets these last two years, the company had yet to actually reuse one of these vehicles.
         
Now with today’s launch, SpaceX has proven that part of a used Falcon 9 can successfully launch to space again. And the fact that the vehicle successfully returned to Earth in one piece means that the rocket is poised to launch for a third time. Now SpaceX can boast nine successful rocket landings, as well as a Falcon 9 that has gone to and from space two times now.
 
“It’s been 15 years to get to this point, it’s taken us a long time,” Musk said. “A lot of difficult steps along the way, but I’m just incredibly proud of the SpaceX for being able to achieve this incredible milestone in the history of space.”
 
The rocket used for today’s launch was the second Falcon 9 that SpaceX ever recovered. It was the vehicle used for CRS-8, the company’s eighth cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. On April 8th, the rocket sent nearly 7,000 pounds of supplies — including an inflatable habitat module called the BEAM — to the station for NASA. After launch, the rocket then landed on SpaceX’s drone ship, titled Of Course I Still Love You. SpaceX decided to launch this Falcon 9 again first, since the company wanted to save the first rocket it ever landed — a vehicle that sent 11 satellites into orbit for the company ORBCOMM in December 2015. That stage is now on display at SpaceX’s headquarters in Hawthorne, California.
Though today’s launch was historic for the aerospace industry, it was otherwise routine for SpaceX. The Falcon 9 help to loft a communications satellite for the company SES, which is based out of Luxembourg. The satellite, called SES-10, will eventually sit in a high orbit 22,000 miles up and deliver communications services exclusively to Latin America. SpaceX confirmed that SES-10 was successfully deployed shortly after the launch.
 
SES had been very vocal about its desire to be the first company to launch on a used rocket. And there is certainly financial incentive for customers. SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell has said that customers that fly on a used Falcon 9 could eventually get discounts of up to 30 percent. Since the cost to launch a Falcon 9 starts at around $60 million, launching on a used rocket could start at around $40 million. For the first few relaunches, though, Shotwell told Space News that the discounts will be more in the order of 10 percent. Neither SpaceX nor SES disclosed how much money was saved for this flight.
 
“We did receive a discount. Obviously to fly this there was some interest and there was some incentive to do so,” Martin Halliwell, CTO of SES, said in a press conference prior to the launch. “But it is not just the money in this particular case. It’s really, ‘let’s get this proof-of-concept moving.’ Someone has to go first here and SES has a long history of doing this.”
 
If SpaceX wants to maximize the economic benefits of its reusable rockets, the best method is to launch these vehicles as frequently as possible. But before a rocket can launch again, it has to be inspected, refurbished, and tested a few times to ensure that it’s ready for spaceflight. It took SpaceX up to four months to get this rocket ready for flight today, according to Shotwell, but the company is working to trim down that turnaround time. SpaceX could have a lot of practice on that front soon, as it expects to launch up to six pre-flown Falcon 9s this year.
 

 

scallop

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #28 on: 02-04-2017, 08:15:30 »
Nek se jave kad reše pitanje otpada.
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #29 on: 06-05-2017, 05:13:16 »
The First Results from the Juno Mission Reveal Surprises at Jupiter
 
Quote

NASA's Juno spacecraft has been in orbit around Jupiter for nearly a year, and we're finally getting a first look at some of the discoveries the probe has been making. The first data from the Juno probe was presented at the annual conference of the European Geosciences Union. The new findings from Juno are already challenging our understanding of the largest planet in the solar system.
Previous observations of Jupiter from the Galileo spacecraft suggested that Jupiter was made mostly of a uniform interior with a solid core of metallic hydrogen. New gravitational data from Juno call that into question. It now appears that Jupiter's internal layers are not uniform at all, but instead regularly mix together.
Another important discovery is that Jupiter's magnetic field is actually much more powerful than previously believed. Jupiter's magnetic field was already known as the largest structure in the solar system, stretching more than 4 million miles in multiple directions. It was thought to be 10 to 20 times as powerful as Earth's magnetic field.
But Juno's measurements seem to indicate that Jupiter's magnetic field is even stronger than that. Results from the spacecraft suggest that the field might be almost twice as strong as previously believed. In addition, the field appears to be uneven in places, which means that unlike the Earth, Jupiter's magnetic field is generated closer to the surface rather than deep near the core.
All of this new information comes from only Juno's first five orbits of Jupiter. The craft has at least seven more orbits before the budgeted end of mission in July 2018, but depending on how the spacecraft is doing, Juno could operate for longer than that. There's certainly still plenty more to discover about Jupiter.
 

Ugly MF

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #30 on: 06-05-2017, 07:36:54 »
Molio bih auditorijum hiperintelektualaca koij jedva cekaju nesto s' Marsa samo prvih 15 sekundi da pogledaju,
nista vise....


Аксентије Новаковић

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #31 on: 04-09-2017, 08:00:29 »
Оће диду на Марс, а ни до Месеца стигли нису...




scallop

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Re: Idemo na Mars, idemo na Mars!!!
« Reply #34 on: Yesterday at 12:47:59 »
Mnogo mi se dopada priča o odlasku na Mars, ali još ne znam dovoljno da bih napisao priču. Znamo da su lava tuneli zgodni da se smestimo i gde bi moglo da bude vode. Nevolja je što nisu na istom mestu. Ipak, neko će se naći tamo za desetak godina, pa ko doživi pričaće. Najbolji kandidat mi je Elon Mask. Dovoljno je tvrdoglav i zna da naparavi pare.
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.