Author Topic: Nature's Weird  (Read 39750 times)

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Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #50 on: 18-08-2012, 09:00:24 »
Način da nas priroda podseti da se ne opuštamo previše:
 
 Hook-legged spider found in Oregon cave 

 
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A group of cave explorers and scientists have made a rare discovery:  an entirely new taxonomic family of spider in the caves of southern Oregon.

Only two other spider families (the taxonomic group above both genus and species) have been found since 1990, and this is the first newly discovered, native one uncovered in North America since 1890, said California Academy of Sciences researcher Charles Griswold, lead author of the study that described the species.
So far, the family consists only of the one species described, which the researchers named Trogloraptor marchingtoni. The species is named after Neil Marchington, a member of the Western Cave Conservancy, who first discovered the spider. The genus name, Trogloraptor, means "cave robber."
It's an apt name for a spider with unique hooks, or claws, on its legs, which the researchers believe are used to snatch flying insects, like midges, out of the air. With its legs outstretched, the spider measures up to 3 inches (8 centimeters) long.
"They're biggish," Griswold said. "But when you're in a cave and it's dark and there's only the beam of your head lamp, they look much bigger. It's quite astonishing to see them hanging from a few threads." [Gallery: Spooky Spiders]
Griswold and his colleagues think that the newly discovered spiders hang from the underside of caves on simple webs, waiting to snatch a meal with their astonishing sicklelike legs. The few specimens Griswold and his graduate student Tracy Audisio have reared in the lab, though, haven't eaten anything. "It seems very shy," Griswold told OurAmazingPlanet.
The spider also has poisonous glands, although there's no evidence that it is dangerous to humans.
Griswold said this discovery could help explain why there are legends about giant spiders living in caves in this region. And perhaps there are other similar species yet to be found; many caves, especially in the western United States, remain little studied.
Finding a new family like this is an historic moment for the field. "It is just as fascinating to arachnologists as the discovery of a new dinosaur is to paleontologists," said spider expert Norman Platnick at the American Museum of Natural History. Platnick was not involved in the discovery or description of the new species.
Another unusual thing about the spider is that it has two rows of teeth, or serrula. "I don't recall seeing any other spiders with that kind of serrula," Platnick told OurAmazingPlanet.
Currently, there are only 111 recognized spider families. New families get added in one of two ways. The more common way is by studying a group that has already been described, and discovering that its relationships are not what had been previously thought, Platnick said. Less common is a case like Trogloraptor, where a new family is established when the animal is first described, he said.
The spider was first found by citizen scientists from the Western Cave Conservancy and taken to Audisio, who showed it to Griswold. At first, they thought it was a brown recluse, a poisonous type of spider. But closer examination revealed it was unique, and they spent two years determining that it is a new family. Their results are published today (Aug. 17) in the journal ZooKeys. 
 

Josephine

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #51 on: 18-08-2012, 11:55:36 »
Brrrrrrr

PTY

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #52 on: 22-08-2012, 19:42:59 »

PTY

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Melkor

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #54 on: 31-08-2012, 02:35:24 »
"Realism is a literary technique no longer adequate for the purpose of representing reality."

mac

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #55 on: 31-08-2012, 09:15:27 »
Čitao sam da su kitovima nezgodne peščane plaže jer slika plaže dobijena od sonara je ista kao slika otvorenog mora. I čitao sam da vojni sonari toliko smetaju kitovima da se ovi slude i hoće da pošto-poto pobegnu od tog zvuka. Ko će ga znati.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #56 on: 04-09-2012, 12:49:18 »


Melkor

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #58 on: 10-10-2012, 03:03:33 »
Jel to nesto novo ili ono od pre 5 godina?
"Realism is a literary technique no longer adequate for the purpose of representing reality."

PTY

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #59 on: 10-10-2012, 08:57:13 »

 
A new dinosaur species named Pegomastax africanus, or "thick jaw from Africa," is shown in this photograph of a model released to Reuters by University of Chicago paleontologist. An American scientist has identified a new dinosaur species, a small-bodied herbivore that he describes as a cross between "a bird, a vampire and a porcupine." The strange-looking species, which Paul Sereno, a University of Chicago paleontologist, has named Pegomastax africanus, or "thick jaw from Africa," lived between 100 million to 200 million years ago. It had the weight of a small house cat and stood less than a foot off of the ground.
Image by: HANDOUT / REUTERS

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #60 on: 12-10-2012, 09:38:18 »
Argh!!!!!!!1
 
http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/blog/36349/giant+mystery+eyeball+discovered+on+south+florida+beach/
 

 
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The discovery of an enormous eyeball on a South Florida beach begs a very pertinent question: What kind of creature did it belong to? The "mystery eyeball," as it's being referred to by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, was found Wednesday by a beachcomber on Pompano Beach.

 
Carli Segelson, spokeswoman for the agency, said the eyeball is slightly larger than a baseball and presumably belonged to some kind of marine animal.

"We're hoping to determine what kind, but at this point we just don't know," Segelson said.

The eyeball is being preserved and will be delivered to the agency's research lab in St. Petersburg, where it's hoped an official identification can be made.

Meanwhile, people are making all sorts of guesses.

Perhaps the best comes from George Burgess of the Florida Museum of Natural History. Burgess has suggested that the eye may have belonged to a bigeye thresher shark. The species is found off Florida in moderately deep water, and the sharks are aptly named.

Other guesses have appeared on the FWC's Facebook page.

"I'm going for a whale eye ...," reads one comment.

"Giant squid?" reads another.

Then there was this more adventurous theory: "A giant squid ripped out a whale's eye."

Segelson said it might be several days before a precise identification is made.

 

scallop

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #61 on: 12-10-2012, 09:58:37 »
Ovo me podseti na onu pecarošku. Kad su lažovu vezali šake i rekli mu: "Ajd' sad pokaži kolika je bila!" A, on razmakne šake i kaže: "E, ovoliko joj je oko bilo." :!:
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #62 on: 12-10-2012, 10:06:55 »
Taj rad.
 
Ali, ozbiljno, zamisli to, dođeš na plažu, baciš peškir na pesak, taman se spremiš da se izvališ i malo čitaš ko čovek, a onda osetiš da te nešto ovako gleda.  :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #63 on: 12-10-2012, 10:22:55 »
Oh...
 
IZDAJA!!! Nećemo moći da kloniramo dinosauruse!!!!!!!  :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:  Pa, mislim, zbog čega sam uopšte jutros ustao iz kreveta?
 
 DNA has a 521-year half-life 
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  Genetic material can't be recovered from dinosaurs — but it lasts longer than thought. 
 
Few researchers have given credence to claims that samples of dinosaur DNA have survived to the present day, but no one knew just how long it would take for genetic material to fall apart. Now, a study of fossils found in New Zealand is laying the matter to rest — and putting paid to hopes of cloning a Tyrannosaurus rex.
After cell death, enzymes start to break down the bonds between the nucleotides that form the backbone of DNA, and micro-organisms speed the decay. In the long run, however, reactions with water are thought to be responsible for most bond degradation. Groundwater is almost ubiquitous, so DNA in buried bone samples should, in theory, degrade at a set rate.
Determining that rate has been difficult because it is rare to find large sets of DNA-containing fossils with which to make meaningful comparisons. To make matters worse, variable environmental conditions such as temperature, degree of microbial attack and oxygenation alter the speed of the decay process.
But palaeogeneticists led by Morten Allentoft at the University of Copenhagen and Michael Bunce at Murdoch University in Perth, Australia, examined 158 DNA-containing leg bones belonging to three species of extinct giant birds called moa. The bones, which were between 600 and 8,000 years old, had been recovered from three sites within 5 kilometres of each other, with nearly identical preservation conditions including a temperature of 13.1 ºC. The findings are published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B1.
 Diminishing returns By comparing the specimens' ages and degrees of DNA degradation, the researchers calculated that DNA has a half-life of 521 years. That means that after 521 years, half of the bonds between nucleotides in the backbone of a sample would have broken; after another 521 years half of the remaining bonds would have gone; and so on.
 
The team predicts that even in a bone at an ideal preservation temperature of −5 ºC, effectively every bond would be destroyed after a maximum of 6.8 million years. The DNA would cease to be readable much earlier — perhaps after roughly 1.5 million years, when the remaining strands would be too short to give meaningful information.
“This confirms the widely held suspicion that claims of DNA from dinosaurs and ancient insects trapped in amber are incorrect,” says Simon Ho, a computational evolutionary biologist at the University of Sydney in Australia. However, although 6.8 million years is nowhere near the age of a dinosaur bone — which would be at least 65 million years old — “We might be able to break the record for the oldest authentic DNA sequence, which currently stands at about half a million years,” says Ho.
The calculations in the latest study were quite straightforward, but many questions remain.
“I am very interested to see if these findings can be reproduced in very different environments such as permafrost and caves,” says Michael Knapp, a palaeogeneticist at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand.
Moreover, the researchers found that age differences accounted for only 38.6% of the variation in DNA degradation between moa-bone samples. “Other factors that impact on DNA preservation are clearly at work,” says Bunce. “Storage following excavation, soil chemistry and even the time of year when the animal died are all likely contributing factors that will need looking into.”
  Journal name: Nature DOI: doi:10.1038/nature.2012.11555  References 

Ygg

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #64 on: 21-10-2012, 13:05:29 »
Par sličica sa fejsbuka:


Meet the sarcastic fringehead! Found in the Pacific ocean off of North America, these ferocious fish are fiercely territorial and very aggressive.




A monster? An alien? Nope, this is a macroscopic image of a Polychaete, or bristle worm. They can survive intense sea pressures and some live around deep sea vents, miles below the surface.





Shark skin when viewed under an electron microscope.
 These scale like formations are called dermal denticles, and they cover the bodies of all sharks. They share an evolutionary origin with vertebrate teeth. Like teeth, each denticle has a central pulp cavity supplied with blood vessels, and an outer layer of an enamel like substance. Studies have found that these denticles reduce drag, and make sharks more efficient swimmers.





Monkey orchids, found in the Peruvian cloud forest. Scientific name: Dracula simia.

"I am the end of Chaos, and of Order, depending upon how you view me. I mark a division. Beyond me other rules apply."

Milosh

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"Ernest Hemingway once wrote: "The world is a fine place and worth fighting for." I agree with the second part."

http://milosh.mojblog.rs/

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #66 on: 21-12-2012, 11:37:39 »
Oh, čekajte dok se ovoga dočepaju Marvelovi urednici:
 
Pauk koji od grančica i paučine pravi model većeg pauka da zavara druge životinje

Melkor

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"Realism is a literary technique no longer adequate for the purpose of representing reality."

дејан

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #68 on: 11-01-2013, 15:01:16 »

пешчана олуја у аустралији


An enormous wall of dust has hit part of Australia as residents brace themselves for a tropical cyclone....


Menacing: The towering red dust storm is pictured rolling across the ocean as it approaches Onslow in West Australia





и снимак
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcnMXNiVNSw
...barcode never lies
FLA

Karl Rosman

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"On really romantic evenings of self, I go salsa dancing with my confusion."
"Well, I've wrestled with reality for 35 years, Doctor, and I'm happy to state I finally won over it"

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #70 on: 16-01-2013, 11:00:10 »
Neka morbidna radoznalost me je naterala da ipak ovo pogledam, iako se već sa stilla videlo da ću imati košmare  :cry: :cry:

Agota

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #71 on: 16-01-2013, 11:41:12 »
Spaghetti with spider! Delicious . :lol:
This is a gift, it comes with a price. Who is the lamb and who is the knife. Midas is king and he holds me so tight. And turns me to gold in the sunlight ...

mac

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #72 on: 16-01-2013, 13:02:57 »

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #73 on: 24-01-2013, 09:53:58 »
Eh, a šta ste vi radili kad ste imali 14 godina?
 
Boy in Ukraine makes amazing long-distance, deep-sea discovery
 
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Kirill Dudko, a 14-year-old from Ukraine, has provided scientists in Canada with remarkable footage from their own remote deep-sea cameras: the first-known photo documentation of an elephant seal slurping a hagfish from the sea floor--at an astonishing depth of 2,933 feet. (Watch the mammal grab the hagfish in the first clip, and see scientist Steven Mihaly explain Dudko's discovery in the second.)



Dudko, who is obsessed with deep-sea biology, spends lots of time monitoring video feeds from sea-floor cameras and collecting clips for his YouTube channel. He singled out the elephant seal clip after spotting the quick event, which occurred in Barkley Canyon off Canada's Pacific coast.

The boy, who could not identify the critter because only part of its face is visible in the footage, wrote to Neptune Canada, stating: "Suddenly, a huge creature grabbed the hagfish. You know, it was like a horror film! This creature wasn't a fish, and I realized it was a mammal because of its nose and mustache."



Scientists identified the mammal as an elephant seal, a species that has been recoded diving to depths of nearly 5,000 feet. Elephant seals can remain underwater for up to two hours.

Hagfish are slender, eel-like critters that favor soft-mud habitat. They're blind foragers that rely heavily on olfactory senses and feed chiefly on fish and worm-like creatures. Because they produce considerable amounts of slime, they're also called slime eels.

 

PTY

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #74 on: 28-01-2013, 08:55:16 »
ScienceNow is reporting that marine biologists working in the Azorean archipelago of the Northern Atlantic have discovered a group of sperm whales who appear to have taken in an adult bottlenose dolphin who has a rather serious spinal malformation. And it wasn't just a one-time encounter for the two species; the dolphin appears to be sticking around. 
Other than the 'S' shape curvature to its body, the dolphin appears to be healthy. The researchers have virtually no way of knowing if the deformity has anything to do with the unprecedented inter-species co-mingling — though they suspect that it does.
 
Dolphins are a hierarchical species, so they may have shunned this particular member on account of its serious birth defect. In the words of one of the researchers, Alexander Wilson, "It might be that this individual didn't fit in, so to speak, with its original group." Or maybe it just couldn't keep up. For now, however, this will all have to remain speculative thinking.
 
http://io9.com/5977738/sperm-whales-adopt-a-dolphin-with-spine-deformity
 
 

 
 

Melkor

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"Realism is a literary technique no longer adequate for the purpose of representing reality."

Gaff

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Sum, ergo cogito, ergo dubito.

zakk

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #77 on: 13-02-2013, 11:57:10 »
AAAaah, brazilski pauci, video juče na Wired-u... Sve se setim one jedne sveske Sudije Dreda iz Lasera(?) i stresem se...
Why shouldn't things be largely absurd, futile, and transitory? They are so, and we are so, and they and we go very well together.

Mouchette

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #78 on: 16-02-2013, 12:58:16 »
http://mouchetteblog.blogspot.com/
''Ma jock, ona, u stvari, želi nasmejan svet. Ili lud.''

Melkor

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"Realism is a literary technique no longer adequate for the purpose of representing reality."

Josephine

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #80 on: 19-02-2013, 04:26:32 »
ček kad neki podvodni vulkan drmne jedan oveći cunami...

Gaff

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Sum, ergo cogito, ergo dubito.

Gaff

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #82 on: 26-02-2013, 15:35:42 »

The Piglet Squid

(via WTF, Evolution?)
Sum, ergo cogito, ergo dubito.

Ghoul

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #83 on: 07-03-2013, 13:01:28 »
Fungal infection causes tarantula to grow antlers




This image may look like something dreamed up for a surreal horror movie, but it's a real horror for the tarantula in question. This unfortunate arachnid is infected with Cordyceps, a parasitic fungus that replaces its host's tissue with its own.

Cordyceps fungi invades its hosts (mainly arthropods), and its mycelium eventually replaces the host's tissue. Once the arthropod is dead, cylindrical or branching growths emerge from the creature's dead body. Some species also have mind-control capabilities, convincing the host to travel to a place where the fungus will find optimal growth conditions before the host dies.


Gaff

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #84 on: 17-03-2013, 13:53:46 »
Sum, ergo cogito, ergo dubito.

Gaff

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #85 on: 24-03-2013, 12:19:31 »

Riba ribi grize.

via WTF, Evolution?

Sum, ergo cogito, ergo dubito.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #86 on: 16-07-2013, 15:26:12 »
Ja imam utisak da je Alah paukove dizajnirao sa posebnim ciljem da me spreči da ikad ponovo usnim. Evo, recimo ovaj pauk pravi "strašila" koja liče na njega ali su deset puta veća  :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: Onda stoji iznad njih i trese mrežu da izgleda kao dase pomeraju.

FIRST VIDEO OF NEW SPIDER SPECIES! - Smarter Every Day 78

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #87 on: 15-08-2013, 18:56:27 »

Ghoul

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #88 on: 15-08-2013, 19:17:45 »
oho, dobar za bundicu ili bar kapu...

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #89 on: 15-08-2013, 22:33:52 »
Nikad se ne zna, možda je i ukusan.

Father Jape

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #90 on: 15-08-2013, 23:00:10 »
Neko reče na Tviteru

The olinguito isn't a completely new discovery - it was just miscategorized. Sort of like when you discover your chihuahua is actually a rat.

 :lol:
Blijedi čovjek na tragu pervertita.
To je ta nezadrživa napaljenost mladosti.
Dušman u odsustvu Dušmana.

https://lingvistickebeleske.wordpress.com

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #91 on: 25-09-2013, 09:49:14 »
Za promenu nešto što nije pauk na ovom topiku:

Diver photographs ‘Cookie Monster of the Sea’

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Mauricio Handler's wife was first to spot sea sponge that looked like famous 'Sesame Street' character, and swam to him laughing through her mask

Scuba divers are often amazed by the beauty of the reefs and their colorful inhabitants, and sometimes they’re even amused.
That certainly was the case for Mauricio Handler and his wife, Julia, during their last adventure to the reefs of Curacao in the Caribbean.
Among their many wonderful discoveries was that of a purple sea sponge that strongly resembled the famous Cookie Monster Muppet of “Sesame Street” fame.
Handler said via email that he had initially swam past the peculiar-looking sponge, without noticing it among the many other sponges on the reef.
But Julia came face to face with what the Handlers now refer to as “The Cookie Monster of the Sea,” and could not contain her laughter.


“It was Julia who went to get me, laughing through her mask about the unusual sponge,” Handler said. “So I did an about-face and went straight to it, and worked the subject to light it perfectly to get as much personality out of the picture as possible.”
It was a job well done by the photographer, who said the Cookie Monster was actually three tube sponges that had fused together over time. (Sea sponges, while they may appear to be plant-like, are actually multi-cellular animals that attach to the sea floor, or to reefs, and feed by filtering particles from currents.)
“I could not believe the fact that this was so unusual—so unique and humorous,” added Handler, who was shooting with a Nikon D3 DSLR, and a Nikon 105 macro lens.
The Cookie Monster of the Sea, which was featured earlier this week by the Daily Mail, is about three feet tall and located off Westpunt in northwest Curacao.
It cannot speak, obviously, but Sesame Street fans might imagine what it would be saying if it could: “Me want cookie!”
–Find Mauricio Handler on Facebook, Instagram, and Vimeo.
–Find Pete Thomas on Facebook and Twitter




Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #92 on: 04-10-2013, 11:44:51 »
Još jedan dokaz u prilog tvrdnji da okeane treba bombardovati nuklearnim oružjem iz orbite. To je jedini način da budemo sigurni:

Beachgoers in Spain discover 30-foot giant squid


Quote
Carcass found in Cantabria is that of the mysterious and fabled Architeuthis Dux; it remains unclear whether the deep-sea denizen will be put on display

Beachgoers in the Spanish community of Cantabria were astonished Tuesday when they stumbled onto the carcass of a giant squid that had washed ashore almost fully intact.
The deep-sea denizen—the fabled and mysterious Architeuthis Dux—measured 30 feet and weighed nearly 400 pounds.
It was delivered to the Maritime Museum of Cantabria, where it was cleaned and frozen, while a decision is awaited between museum scientists and the government as to what will be done with the colossal cephalopod.


(According to El Diario Montanes, there has been some argument regarding ownership, and it remains unclear whether the squid will be put on display, eventually, or dissected in the name of science. According to some reports it was initially to be simply cremated.)
Regardless, the discovery was remarkable, considering that giant squid, although they’re the largest invertebrates on earth, are extremely elusive and, thus, difficult to study.
They generally reside at depths of between 1,000 and 3,000 feet, and most of what scientists have learned has come from carcasses that have washed ashore, and rarely are entire carcasses found.
However, scientists are persistent in their quest to learn more. In 2004, Japanese researchers captured the first known live images of giant squid. In 2006, a team of Japanese researchers brought to the surface a live female squid measuring 24 feet.
The mysterious creatures, meanwhile, remain steeped in lore.
In the times of ancient mariners, Architeuthis Dux, which resides in the lightless depths of all of the world’s oceans, is believed to have spawned tales of sea monsters, such as the legendary Kraken.
Architeuthis Dux was one of the vicious creatures in Jules Verne’s classic science fiction novel, “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.” (First published in 1870; made into a Disney movie in 1954.)
It was represented in other books, too, from Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick” to Ian Fleming’s “Dr. No,” to Peter Benchley’s “Beast” (later adapted as a film, “The Beast”).
To many, the mere mention of giant squid conjures images of the beasts waging vicious battles with deep-diving sperm whales, although in these battles the squid is the prey and the whales are the predators.
The giant squid that washed ashore in Cantabria was photographed by Enrique Talledo, who allowed the use of images accompanying this story.
“The animal died at sea and ocean currents brought it to the coast,” Talledo said via email. “The squid was in good condition except one [tentacle] had been broken.”
He remarked the eyes were gigantic and almost lifelike.
That’s no surprise because the giant squid, according to National Geographic, possess the largest eyes in the animal kingdom. They can measure 10 inches in diameter, almost the size of beach balls, and it’s believed the size helps the creatures detect objects in their dark habitat.
There are only a handful of museums that have a giant squid carcass on display. Hopefully, the public in Cantabria will soon be able to admire this remarkable specimen.
–Find photographer Enrique Talledo on Facebook
–Find Pete Thomas on Facebook and Twitter







scallop

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #93 on: 04-10-2013, 12:25:16 »
Bolje da su je isporučili nekoj lokalnoj kafani.
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #94 on: 05-10-2013, 08:16:16 »
Jebemti. Ovo ko iz nekog horor filma:
 Deadly giant hornets kill 42 people in China
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Hong Kong (CNN) -- Hornets have killed dozens of people in China and injured more than 1,500 with their powerful venomous sting.
 
The Asian giant hornet, known scientifically as Vespa mandarinia, carries a venom that destroys red blood cells, which can result in kidney failure and death, said Justin O. Schmidt, an entomologist at the Southwest Biological Institute in Tucson, Arizona.
 
But perhaps a bigger problem than the toxicity of the venom is allergy, Schmidt says. Some people are naturally more allergic to stinging insects than others; a sting can trigger a deadly anaphylactic reaction, which may involve airway closure or cardiac arrest.
 
Since July, hornet attacks have killed 42 people and injured 1,675 people in three cities in Shaanxi province, according to the local government. Among those attacked, 206 are receiving treatment in hospitals.
 
What are these hornets?
 
In person, the Asian giant hornet, which is the largest hornet species in the world, looks like "the wasp analog of a pit bull" with "a face that looks like you just can't reason with it," said Christopher K. Starr, professor of entomology at University of West Indes in Trinidad & Tobago.
 
These hornets are found throughout East and Southeast Asia, in countries such as in China, Korea, Japan, India and Nepal.
 
And they're big. The giant hornet extends about 3.5 to 3.9 centimeters in length (1.4 to 1.5 inches), roughly the size of a human thumb, and it has black tooth used for burrowing, according to an animal database at the University of Michigan. The queens are even bigger, with bodies that can grow longer than 5 centimeters (2 inches).
 
The species feed their young the larvae of other insects and use their mandibles to sever the limbs and heads of their prey.
 
The giant hornets are attracted to human sweat, alcohol and sweet flavors and smells. They are especially sensitive to when animals or people run, according to Xinhua.
 
Every breeding season, the giant hornets produce an average of 1,000 to 2,000 offspring, Schmidt said. They feast on other insects such as wasps and bees, launching coordinated attacks on the hives of their prey.
 
Most hornet hives or nests are tucked away in secluded places, such as tree hollows or even underground.
 
"It's very difficult to prevent the attacks, because hornet nests are usually in hidden sites," said Shunichi Makino, director general of the Hokkaido Research Center for Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute in Japan.
 
Asian giant hornets and other terrifying creatures
 
What is the human impact?
 
Over the summer and early fall, hornets have invaded schools full of children and descended upon unsuspecting farm workers in China.
 
One of them is Mu Conghui, who was attacked in Ankang City while looking after her millet crop.
 
"The hornets were horrifying," she told Xinhua, the Chinese state-run news agency. "They hit right at my head and covered my legs. All of a sudden, I was stung, and I couldn't move.
 
"Even now, my legs are covered with sting holes."
 
Two months, 13 dialysis treatments and 200 stitches later, Mu still remains hospitalized and unable to move her legs.
 
Makino, who specializes in entomology, warned that the sting from an Asian giant hornet was severe compared with those of other insects.
 
The influx of venom to the human body can cause allergic reactions and multiple organ failure, leading to death. Patients like Mu have been receiving dialysis to remove the toxins from their bodies. In photos, patients bore deep, dark craters scattered across their limbs, the size of bullet wounds.
 
Dr. Wang Xue, director of the intensive care unit at First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University and an expert of the provincial hornet sting treatment guidance unit, warned in a Shaanxi government release that hornets tend to be aggressive and more active during September and October, their breeding season. The hornets do not go into hibernation until December, according to local government authorities.
 
Local authorities have deployed thousands of police officers and locals to destroy the hives. About 710 hives have been removed and at least 7 million yuan (about $1.1 million U.S.) sent to areas affected by hornets, according to a government press release.
 
Why so many attacks now?
 
The spate of attacks could be caused by the unusually dry weather in the area, authorities say. The arid environment makes it easier for hornets to breed. Urbanization could also be a contributing factor, as humans move into hornets' habitats.
 
Some experts cited in Xinhua stated additional factors such as increased vegetation and a decrease in the hornets' enemies, such as spiders and birds, because of ecological changes.
 
In other words, it's a good season for the hornet population, which makes it a bad season for people who encounter them.
 
The provincial government of Shaanxi has warned residents to wear long sleeves when outdoors and not to attempt to drive the swarms away or remove the hives.
 
Japan is familiar with Asian giant hornet stings, too. About 30 to 50 deaths are reported each year in Japan from such attacks, according to Japanese studies. Most of the deaths are due to allergies to the venom, Makino said.
 
The giant hornets are also destructive to western honeybees. Research in Japan suggests that tens of thousands of honeybee hives are damaged by the giant hornets each year.
 
How to protect yourself
 
People run into trouble when these hornets form a nest: a basketball-shaped nest that looks like it's made of gray paper, sometimes under an eave, Schmidt said. If you disturb one of these, or happen to whack a tree that has a nest in it, the hornets may respond as if they're under attack.
 
Humans can get themselves in danger by reacting poorly to these large hornets. If you see a nest or a hive, just avoid it, Schmidt says. If one of them buzzes around you, don't panic.
 
"Don't flap or scream or freak out," he advised. "Just calmly walk away."
 
One victim told local media this month that "the more you run, the more they want to chase you." Some victims described being chased about 200 meters (656 feet) by a swarm.
 
An area of research that hasn't been explored is how many people get stung by these hornets while taking down a nest in order to use the larvae as fish bait, or even to eat. The larvae do not have venom, Schmidt explained. But in general, people should not tamper with these nests.
 
As powerful as their sting can be, it is highly unlikely that these hornets would travel all the way to the United States to find a new home, Schmidt said, or in the United Kingdom for that matter. To go to Western Europe, they'd have to cross some "nasty deserts" to which they are not adapted.
 
As deadly as live adult giant hornets can be, some people don't shy away from them altogether.
 
There is a sports drink in Japan called VAAM that incorporates amino acids derived from hornets.
 
In Taiwan, where the giant hornet is known as the "tiger head," the insect is sometimes used in alcoholic drinks, Starr said, the idea being that "the essence of this great big strong hornet will go out into the booze, and when you drink it, you'll become strong."
 
That's one way to get a buzz.
 

 
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Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #95 on: 18-10-2013, 09:50:32 »
Hmmm... tvrde da je Jeti tek nekakav.. medved...

Geneticist Unravels Yeti's DNA

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The Himalaya's mysterious Abominable Snowman might harbor an even deeper mystery, according to an Oxford University geneticist who says he has sequenced the mythic beast's DNA and proved its existence.
For centuries, native people in the snow-peaked Himalaya Mountains have described an elusive apelike animal that roams the range, and which they call the yeti.
Bryan Sykes, a professor of genetics at Oxford, sequenced DNA taken from two unidentified animals killed in Himalaya ranges of India and Bhutan in recent decades.
The small samples - including a single hair found a decade ago, and the jawbone of a mummified animal discovered in the 1970s by a hunter - were compared to a database of thousands of known animals, and the results were intriguing.
The samples suggest, according to Sykes, that the animal many people have reported seeing may be an unknown species of bear, related to an extinct polar bear.
"This is a species that hasn't been recorded for 40,000 years. Now, we know one of these was walking around ten years ago. And what's interesting is that we have found this type of animal at both ends of the Himalayas. If one were to go back, there would be others still there," Sykes told reporters.
Sykes believes the animal could be a hybrid descended from two species of bear, an extinct polar bear and a closely related brown bear.
He said accounts of hunters, mountaineers and others who claim to have seen a yeti, may have come face to face with an unknown bear that acts strangely.
"The fact that the hunter, who had great experience of bears, thought this one was in some way unusual and was frightened of it, makes me wonder if this species of bear might behave differently. Maybe it is more aggressive, more dangerous or is more bipedal than other bears," he said.


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Meho Krljic

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Re: Nature's Weird
« Reply #98 on: 03-05-2014, 07:34:08 »
Sreća moja da sam sa morem raskrstio još u prošlom veku jer ovo...
 
 
http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/nature/post/goblin-shark-caught-gulf-mexico-rarity/
 
 


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