Author Topic: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba  (Read 28159 times)

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Alexdelarge

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #50 on: 07-09-2013, 00:14:35 »
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Alexdelarge

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #51 on: 02-10-2013, 21:45:49 »
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Alexdelarge

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #52 on: 22-12-2013, 16:13:04 »
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Meho Krljic

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #53 on: 27-12-2013, 12:16:10 »
Pirane u Argentini su VAN KONTROLE!!!

 Biting fish injure more than 70 bathers in Argentina

Quote
BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) - A swarm of biting fish injured more than 70 people who were bathing at a popular beach in Argentina on Christmas, a medical official said on Thursday.
A seven-year-old girl had her finger partially amputated and dozens more suffered bite wounds on their extremities from the fish, a relative of the piranha called "palometas," said Federico Cornier, the director of emergency services in the city of Rosario.
"This is not normal," Cornier said on television. "It's normal for there to be an isolated bite or injury, but the magnitude in this case was great ... this is an exceptional event."
The attack happened off the popular beaches of the Parana River near Rosario, 300 kilometers (186 miles) north of Buenos Aires, where many Argentines were seeking relief from a heat wave over the holiday.
(Reporting By Alejandro Lifschitz, Writing by Mitra Taj; Editing by Kenneth Barry)

Alexdelarge

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #54 on: 11-08-2014, 10:40:49 »
Miroslavu Iliću eksplodirala petarda na ramenu, pevač lakše povređen!

Još jedan festival u Guči je došao kraju, a mnogobrojni Saboraši koji su se okupili u Guči su za kraj imali pravu poslasticu, ali su doživeli i malo straha. Naime, pri ispaljivanju svečanog vatrometa, jedna od manjih raketa je sletela i na pevačevo rame, gde je i eksplodirala, ali je Ilić kao pravi profesionalac pozdravio publiku i napustio scenu sa osmehom. Kako "Blic" saznaje, u pitanju su lakše povrede i Miroslav neće imati problema sa oporavkom.

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Meho Krljic

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #55 on: 07-09-2014, 08:28:16 »
California blue whales rebound from whaling; first of their kin to do so
 
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The number of California blue whales has rebounded to near historical levels, according to new research by the University of Washington, and while the number of blue whales struck by ships is likely above allowable U.S. limits, such strikes do not immediately threaten that recovery.
 
This is the only population of blue whales known to have recovered from whaling – blue whales as a species having been hunted nearly to extinction.
 
 
Blue whales – nearly 100 feet in length and weighing 190 tons as adults – are the largest animals on earth. And they are the heaviest ever, weighing more than twice as much as the largest known dinosaur, the Argentinosaurus. They are an icon of the conservation movement and many people want to minimize harm to them, according to Trevor Branch, UW assistant professor of aquatic and fishery sciences.
 
            “The recovery of California blue whales from whaling demonstrates the ability of blue whale populations to rebuild under careful management and conservation measures,” said Cole Monnahan, a UW doctoral student in quantitative ecology and resource management and lead author of a paper on the subject posted online Sept. 5 by the journal Marine Mammal Science. Branch and André Punt, a UW professor of aquatic and fisheries sciences, are co-authors.
 
California blue whales ­ are at their most visible while at feeding grounds 20 to 30 miles off the California coast, but are actually found along the eastern side of the Pacific Ocean from the equator up into the Gulf of Alaska.
 
Today they number about 2,200, according to monitoring by other research groups. That’s likely 97 percent of the historical level according to the model the co-authors used. That may seem to some a surprisingly low number of whales, Monnahan said, but not when considering how many California blue whales were caught. According to new data Monnahan, Branch and another set of co-authors published earlier this summer in PLOS ONE, approximately 3,400 California blue whales were caught between 1905 and 1971.
 
“Considering the 3,400 caught in comparison to the 346,000 caught near Antarctica gives an idea how much smaller the population of California blue whales was likely to have been,” Branch said.
 
The catches of blue whales from the North Pacific were unknown until scientists – in particular Yulia Ivashchenko of Southern Cross University in Australia – put on their detective caps and teased out numbers from Russian whaling archives that once were classified as secret but are now public. The numbers Russian whalers had publicly reported at one time were incomplete and inaccurate ­– something that was admitted in the late 1990s – but there wasn’t access to the real numbers until recently.
 
For the work published in PLOS ONE, the scientists then used acoustic calls produced by the whales to separate – for the first time – the catches taken from the California population from those whales taken in the western Northern Pacific near Japan and Russia. The two populations are generally accepted by the scientific community as being different. Places where acoustic data indicated one group or the other is present were matched with whaling catches.
 
In the subsequent Marine Mammal Science paper just out, the catches were among the key pieces of information used to model the size of the California blue whale population over time – a model previously used by other groups to estimate populations of hundreds of fish and various other whale species.
 
The population returning to near its historical level explains the slowdown in population growth, noted in recent years, better than the idea of ship strikes, the scientists said.
 
 
There are likely at least 11 blue whales struck a year along the U.S. West Coast, other groups have determined, which is above the “potential biological removal” of 3.1 whales per year allowed by the U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act.
 
The new findings says there could be an 11-fold increase in vessels before there is a 50 percent chance that the population will drop below what is considered “depleted” by regulators.
 
“Even accepting our results that the current level of ship strikes is not going to cause overall population declines, there is still going to be ongoing concern that we don’t want these whales killed by ships,” Branch said.
 
Without ship strikes as a big factor holding the population back – and no other readily apparent human-caused reason (although noise, chemical pollution and interactions with fisheries may impact them) – it is even more likely that the population is growing more slowly because whale numbers are reaching the habitat limit, something called the carrying capacity.
 
“We think the California population has reached the capacity of what the system can take as far as blue whales,” Branch said.
 
“Our findings aren’t meant to deprive California blue whales of protections that they need going forward,” Monnahan said. “California blue whales are recovering because we took actions to stop catches and start monitoring. If we hadn’t, the population might have been pushed to near extinction – an unfortunate fate suffered by other blue whale populations.”
 
“It’s a conservation success story,” Monnahan said.
 
Funding for students working on the research in Branch’s lab comes through the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, a collaboration between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and UW.
 
###
 
For more information:
 –Branch, tbranch@uw.edu
 
Blue Whale News, http://bluewhalenews.org/
 
Journal articles referenced in this release:
 –”Do ship strikes threaten the recovery of endangered eastern North Pacific blue whales?
 Marine Mammal Science
 Co-authors: Cole Monnahan, Trevor Branch and André Punt
 
–”Estimating Historical Eastern North Pacific Blue Whale Catches Using Spatial Calling Patterns
 PLOS One
 June 3, 2014
 Co-authors: Cole Monnahan, Trevor Branch, Kathleen Stafford, Yulia Ivashchenko, Erin Oleson
 

дејан

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #56 on: 23-09-2014, 11:41:06 »
није непозната али је слика учинила...па, необичном




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Meho Krljic

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #57 on: 24-11-2014, 09:59:51 »
Extreme Shrimp May Hold Clues to Alien Life



Quote
At one of the world's deepest undersea hydrothermal vents, tiny shrimp are piled on top of each other, layer upon layer, crawling on rock chimneys that spew hot water. Bacteria, inside the shrimps' mouths and in specially evolved gill covers, produce organic matter that feed the crustaceans.
Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are studying this mysterious ecosystem in the Caribbean to get clues about what life could be like on other planetary bodies, such as Jupiter's icy moon Europa, which has a subsurface ocean.
"For two-thirds of the Earth's history, life has existed only as microbial life," said Max Coleman, senior research scientist at JPL. "On Europa, the best chance for life would be microbial."
The particular bacteria in the vents are able to survive in extreme environments because of chemosynthesis, a process that works in the absence of sunlight and involves organisms getting energy from chemical reactions. In this case, the bacteria use hydrogen sulfide, a chemical abundant at the vents, to make organic matter. The temperatures at the vents can climb up to a scorching 750 degrees Fahrenheit (400 degrees Celsius), but waters just an inch away are cool enough to support the shrimp. The shrimp are blind, but have thermal receptors in the backs of their heads.
"The overall objective of our research is to see how much life or biomass can be supported by the chemical energy of the hot submarine springs," Coleman said.
Hydrogen sulfide is toxic to organisms in high concentrations, but the bacteria feeding the shrimp need a certain amount of this chemical to survive. Nature has worked out a solution: The shrimp position themselves on the very border between normal, oxygenated ocean water and sulfide-rich water so that they and the bacteria can coexist in harmony.
"It's a remarkable symbiotic system," Coleman said.
Coleman was part of a team led by Chris German at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, that discovered these vents in 2009, off the west coast of Cuba. This research, funded under NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets program, detected the vents by picking up the chemical signals of their plumes of water in the ocean.
The researchers returned in 2012 on the RV Atlantis with a robotic vehicle called Jason, supported by the National Science Foundation. Scientists collected extensive specimens from two hydrothermal vent fields: The Von Damm field at 7,500 feet (2,300 meters) and Piccard at more than 16,000 feet (4,900 meters), which is the world's deepest.
Coleman and collaborator Cindy Van Dover, marine biologist at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, examined the shrimp for the first time when the same team returned in 2013 on the RV Falkor, provided by the Schmidt Ocean Institute in Palo Alto, California. Van Dover returned soon after using the robotic vehicle Hercules aboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, and did more collections and studies.
A bonus finding from studying this extreme oasis of life is that some of the shrimp, called Rimicaris hybisae, appear to be cannibalistic. The researchers discovered that when the shrimp arrange themselves in dense groups, bacteria seem to be the main food supplier, as the shrimp likely absorb the carbohydrates that the bacteria produce. But in areas where the shrimp are distributed more sparsely, the shrimp are more likely to turn carnivorous, eating snails, other crustaceans, and even each other.
Although the researchers did not directly observe Rimicaris hybisae practicing cannibalism, scientists did find bits of crustaceans in the shrimps' guts. And Rimicaris hybisae is the most abundant crustacean species in the area by far.
"Whether an animal like this could exist on Europa heavily depends on the actual amount of energy that's released there, through hydrothermal vents," said Emma Versteegh, a postdoctoral fellow at JPL.
The group received funding for shrimp-collecting expeditions from NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets (ASTEP) program, through a project called "Oases for Life." That name is especially appropriate for this investigation, Coleman said.
"You go along the ocean bottom and there's nothing, effectively," Coleman said. "And then suddenly we get these hydrothermal vents and a massive ecosystem. It's just literally teeming with life."
This research was conducted in collaboration with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Duke University. The Schmidt Ocean Institute provided technical and financial support for marine and underwater robotic operations during the 2013 RV Falkor cruise. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.
Media Contact
Elizabeth Landau
 Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
 818-354-6425
 Elizabeth.Landau@jpl.nasa.gov

 2014-407 

Karl Rosman

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"On really romantic evenings of self, I go salsa dancing with my confusion."
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klem

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #59 on: 16-01-2016, 01:05:52 »
Jedva čekali da dođu u  Srbiju: Devin i Mirjana height=874

Mirjana Antonović, bivša ljubavnica folk pevača Miroslava Ilića, juče je doputovala u Srbiju sa sinom Devinom, za koga tvrdi da je naslednik “slavuja iz Mrčajevaca”, kako bi ga posle 28 godina upoznala s ocem. Mirjana i Devin odseli su u porodičnoj kući pevačice Lepe Brene, koja će im biti domaćica narednih dana.

Miroslav je očigledno upoznat sa tom činjenicom, pa se dodatno razbesneo jer već godinama ne razgovara sa koleginicom, pa kada smo ga pozvali, bez ustručavanja je opleo po njoj, ali i onima koji govore da je Devin njegov sin.
- Ne interesuje me ko šta tvrdi, niti me interesuje gde je, šta radi i sa kim se druži. Jedino što imam je poruka za gospođu Fahretu, a to je: “Skini mi se s ku*ca” - rekao je besno Ilić.

http://www.alo.rs/miroslav-najstrasnije-izvredao-brenu/29339
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mac

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #60 on: 16-01-2016, 01:20:31 »
Nešto mi baš i ne liči..

klem

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #61 on: 16-01-2016, 02:14:11 »
vidiš kako oblizuje jezik kao miroslav
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mac

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #62 on: 16-01-2016, 02:30:54 »
To su fotografi i čekali. Nego, ajd što ne liči na Miroslava, nego ne liči ni na sopstvenu majku.

A što se mrze Brena i Miroslav?

klem

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #63 on: 16-01-2016, 05:14:38 »
zato što je miroslav prozivao sašu i brenu da iskorišćavaju zvezde granda bar je to jedan od razloga
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дејан

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Ghoul

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Sergeja Trifunovića ujeo nepoznati muškarac
« Reply #65 on: 27-02-2016, 16:07:07 »
Sergeja Trifunovića ujeo nepoznati muškarac

Glumac Sergej Trifunović povređen u incidentu

Beograd -- Glumac Sergej Trifunović povređen je pod nejasnim okolnostima sinoć u fizičkom obračunu na Vračaru, prenose mediji.

IZVOR: B92 SUBOTA, 27.02.2016. | 13:22

Prema nezvaničnim informacijama beogradskih medija, Trifunović ima rane od ujeda po rukama. Incident se dogodio kasno sinoć na na uglu Molerove i Njegoševe ulice.

Hrvatski “Indeks” prenosi izjavu Trifunovićeve prijateljice koja kaže da on nije teže povređen.

“Bili smo juče na predstavi, on je otišao dalje na Fest, na neki film. Ogladneo je i otišao u fast fud, napao ga je neki pijanac, gricnuo za priste i to je to. Nikakva rana na glavi, teške povrede i slično”, rekla je ona.

Osim toga, “Blic” je kasnije preneo da je policija identifikovala muškarca za kojeg se sumnja da je učestvovao u obračunu sa Trifunovićem.

Njegovo ime još nije saopštila, jer se i dalje radi na utvrđivanju okolnosti događaja.

Takođe, mediji su preneli da je Trifunović posle napada bio prevezen na infektivnu kliniku, odakle je pušten posle pregleda i ukazane pomoći.

Meho Krljic

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #66 on: 13-09-2016, 07:47:56 »
  Dolphins recorded having a conversation 'just like two people' for first time



Quote
   Two dolphins have been recorded having a conversation for the first time after scientists developed an underwater microphone which could distinguish the animals' different "voices".
Researchers have known for decades that the mammals had an advanced form of communication, using distinctive clicks and whistles to show they are excited, happy, stressed or separated  from the group.
But scientists have now shown that dolphins alter the volume and frequency of pulsed clicks to form individual "words" which they string together into sentences in much the same way that humans speak.
Researchers at the Karadag Nature Reserve, in Feodosia, Russia, recorded two Black Sea bottlenose dolphins, called Yasha and Yana, talking to each other in a pool. They found that each dolphin would listen to a sentence of pulses without interruption, before replying.

   Lead researcher Dr Vyacheslav Ryabov, said: “Essentially, this exchange resembles a conversation between two people.
“Each pulse that is produced by dolphins is different from another by its appearance in the time domain and by the set of spectral components in the frequency domain.
“In this regard, we can assume that each pulse represents a phoneme or a word of the dolphin's spoken language.
“The analysis of numerous pulses registered in our experiments showed that the dolphins took turns in producing [sentences] and did not interrupt each other, which gives reason to believe that each of the dolphins listened to the other's pulses before producing its own.
“This language exhibits all the design features present in the human spoken language, this indicates a high level of intelligence and consciousness in dolphins, and their language can be ostensibly considered a highly developed spoken language, akin to the human language.”
 
   Dolphins have possessed brains that are larger and more complex than human ones for more than 25 million years.
The researchers found that Yasha and Yana could create sentences of up to five "words", but the scientists still do not understand the content.
Dr Ryabov said it was now beyond doubt that dolphins speak their own language and it is time to start studying how to communicate directly with them.
“Humans must take the first step to establish relationships with the first intelligent inhabitants of the planet Earth by creating devices capable of overcoming the barriers that stand in the way of using languages and in the way of communications between dolphins and people,” he added.
Scientists already knew that dolphins use more than one thousand different types of whistle depending on social context but it was unclear if they could communicate directly with each other, one to one.
In 2007 Australian scientists identified specific whistles, which were interpreted to mean ‘I’m here, where is everyone’, ‘Hurry up’ and ‘There’s food over here’.
Dolphins are also thought to have developed a type of sign language in which they communicate with their flippers.
A group of scientists in Florida earlier this year showed that the communication between dolphins increases when they are undertaking a difficult task – in one case removing  the lid from a canister – as if they were discussing the best solution.
The new research was published in the journal Mathematics and Physics
 
 
 

Meho Krljic

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #67 on: 29-10-2016, 05:54:59 »
World wildlife 'falls by 58% in 40 years' 
 
Quote

Global wildlife populations have fallen by 58% since 1970, a report says.
The Living Planet assessment, by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and WWF, suggests that if the trend continues that decline could reach two-thirds among vertebrates by 2020.
The figures suggest that animals living in lakes, rivers and wetlands are suffering the biggest losses.
Human activity, including habitat loss, wildlife trade, pollution and climate change contributed to the declines.
Dr Mike Barrett. head of science and policy at WWF, said: "It's pretty clear under 'business as usual' we will see continued declines in these wildlife populations. But I think now we've reached a point where there isn't really any excuse to let this carry on.
"We know what the causes are and we know the scale of the impact that humans are having on nature and on wildlife populations - it really is now down to us to act."
However the methodology of the report has been criticised.
 
The Living Planet Report is published every two years and aims to provide an assessment of the state of the world's wildlife.
 
This analysis looked at 3,700 different species of birds, fish, mammals, amphibians and reptiles - about 6% of the total number of vertebrate species in the world.
The team collected data from peer-reviewed studies, government statistics and surveys collated by conservation groups and NGOs.
Any species with population data going back to 1970, with two or more time points (to show trends) was included in the study.
The researchers then analysed how the population sizes had changed over time.
Some of this information was weighted to take into account the groups of animals that had a great deal of data (there are many records on Arctic and near Arctic birds, for example) or very little data (tropical amphibians, for example). The report authors said this was to make sure a surplus of information about declines in some animals did not skew the overall picture.
The last report, published in 2014, estimated that the world's wildlife populations had halved over the last 40 years.
This assessment suggests that the trend has continued: since 1970, populations have declined by an average of 58%.
Dr Barrett said some groups of animals had fared worse than others.
"We do see particularly strong declines in the freshwater environment - for freshwater species alone, the decline stands at 81% since 1970. This is related to the way water is used and taken out of fresh water systems, and also the fragmentation of freshwater systems through dam building, for example."
It also highlighted other species, such as African elephants , which have suffered huge declines in recent years with the increase in poaching, and sharks, which are threatened by overfishing.
 
The researchers conclude that vertebrate populations are declining by an average of 2% each year, and warn that if nothing is done, wildlife populations could fall by 67% (below 1970 levels) by the end of the decade.
Dr Robin Freeman, head of ZSL's Indicators & Assessments Unit, said: "But that's assuming things continue as we expect. If pressures - overexploitation, illegal wildlife trade, for example - increase or worsen, then that trend may be worse.
"But one of the things I think is most important about these stats, these trends are declines in the number of animals in wildlife populations - they are not extinctions. By and large they are not vanishing, and that presents us with an opportunity to do something about it."
 
However, Living Planet reports have drawn some criticisms.
 
 
Stuart Pimm, professor of conservation ecology at Duke University in the United States, said that while wildlife was in decline, there were too many gaps in the data to boil population loss down to a single figure.
"There are some numbers [in the report] that are sensible, but there are some numbers that are very, very sketchy," he told BBC News.
"For example, if you look at where the data comes from, not surprisingly, it is massively skewed towards western Europe.
"When you go elsewhere, not only do the data become far fewer, but in practice they become much, much sketchier... there is almost nothing from South America, from tropical Africa, there is not much from the tropics, period. Any time you are trying to mix stuff like that, it is is very very hard to know what the numbers mean.
"They're trying to pull this stuff in a blender and spew out a single number.... It's flawed."
But Dr Freeman said the team had taken the best data possible from around the world.
"It's completely true that in some regions and in some groups, like tropical amphibians for example, we do have a lack of data. But that's because there is a lack of data.
"We're confident that the method we are using is the best method to present an overall estimate of population decline.
"It's entirely possible that species that aren't being monitored as effectively may be doing much worse - but I'd be very surprised if they were doing much better than we observed. "
 

Alexdelarge

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #68 on: 27-03-2018, 20:33:33 »
Miroslav Ilić imao napad srca dok je bio za volanom!

U toku prošle nedelje Miroslavu Iliću naglo je pozlilo dok je bio za volanom! Kako SCANDAL! u novom broju saznaje, pevač je imao jake bolove u grudima, te se pretpostavlja da mu je srce dalo signal da nešto nije u redu, a pošto se strašno uplašio, izgubio je kontrolu nad vozilom i sudario se sa audijem!
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Alexdelarge

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Re: Miroslava Ilića ujela nepoznata riba
« Reply #69 on: 10-01-2019, 16:42:16 »
moj se postupak čitanja sastoji u visokoobdarenom prelistavanju.